NAB Freedom Pizza Big Brother break in

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User big brother 1984

I like this effort from Clemenger BBDO Melbourne for NAB.

It fits with their ‘different’ positioning and actually has a point in terms of the product offering to ‘free’ people from locked in contracts.

Even though it didn’t come off, nice bit of social media work.

Not so convinced of the rationale behind NAB putting a $20,000 reward to the first housemate who chooses to leave the Big Brother house. Surely this could be better spent?

And Big Brother should expect more remote control planes, fly-bys, kites, sign writing and any other form of intrusive, interruptive brand work. Nine were not amused, but isn’t there an advertising opportunity in there somewhere?

Tourism Australia Great Southern land TV ad

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Tourism Australia and Qantas have rejigged Icehouse singer Iva Davies Great Southern Land track.

The aim is to sell Australia to tourists.

The first thing that surprises me is that this is more music video than tourist ad?

The second thing is that It will run online only, including Twitter and TA’s Facebook page.

And this is on the back of DDB’s most recent incarnation of the There’s Nothing Like Australia campaign, which cost $4m to produce.

I’m not convinced that a song which means more to Australians than any other nation, sung by artists mainly recognizable only by Australians will attract a flood of foreigners?

And no surfing on golden beaches?

This will have to work very hard via social media if it is to attract the traveler in the face of a strengthening Aussie dollar and I can’t help thinking it is another montage of nice shots and song rather than a strategic advertising effort.

Diet Mountain Dew shark rider TV Ad

An Australian version of this ad drew complaints post a recent spate of shark attacks.

The ASB on giving it the all clear noted consumers’ could interpret the ad as distrespectul given the recent shark attacks, but ruled it didn’t breach Section 2 of the Advertiser Code of Ethics and was in line with health and safety community standards.

The Bureau argued: “Catching or riding a shark is completely unrealistic and most of the community would see this as being fabricated for the purposes of selling the product”.

The brand, owned by Pepsico Australia Holdings, responded: “This commercial was not intended to be insensitive to those who may have suffered in shark attacks. The tone of the advertisment is humorous […] and clearly ‘over the top’ and not intended to replicate in way any real life experience.”

I think an interesting point is the depiction of the shark. Mountain Dew show the shark in full Jaws mode i.e. scary.

A similar effort from Arena takes a different and more relevant approach and is probably better for it. Sharks and any depiction of potential killer instinct at work is tricky at the best of times, let alone when the sharks are attacking swimmers.

Toyota Auris Japanese Transgender car ad

 

This ad is getting a lot of discussion going outside of its exclusive airing in Japan.

The ad features 19-year-old Stav Strashko, who identifies as transgender. The tagline for the campaign is, “not in trend, not casual, not for everyone, not authority, but Auris”

One lesson in advertising (particularly car ads) is make the product / car the star.

This ad is both awkward for its use of a niche personality to sell a mass market product and also fails on presenting anything about the product – I don’t buy the ‘hybrid’ body / car analogy.

It gets attention, but for all the wrong reasons and does little to sell the product. Not relevant, interesting or motivating for the category or target and gratuitous in its use of talent.

 

IKEA Baby Whisperer screaming TV ad

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English: Logo of Ikea.

This is a funny ad, particularly for all the parents out there.

But it also continues in the IKEA tradition of delivering the simple proposition of low prices and decent quality (value).

It is a rare example of an arresting bit of creative that gets your attention and ensures that you remember the advertising message.

Nice work by The Monkeys.

Channel 4 Paralympics ad – Meet the Superhumans

Channel 4 promo

There is some great outdoor advertising in the UK from Channel 4 that features the line “thanks for the warm-up” in reference to their broadcast of the paralympic games in London.

Australia’s satirical show on all things advertising The Gruen Sweat featured this promo (not ad., but in-house produced promo).

This is one of the best examples of selling a product and subject that isn’t instantly in demand from the general public. As well as agency quality production, the genius is in the creative idea that includes the depiction of accidents that led to injury and disability.

The message is that this could be you.

It is a powerfully produced piece of work and a good effort to get our attention and awareness of Channel 4’s broadcast, whether it will drive actual viewership is another question, but given the momentum of the Olympics this is giving the games the best chance of some serious viewing.

This also proves a point I have long believed in. In-house production teams, who know their brand and content, can do a great job to sell it to their viewers at a fraction of the cost of agencies.

A nice taster here:

Channel 4 says the campaign is the biggest it has run since the station launched in 1982.

The advert was directed by Tom Tagholm for Channel 4’s in-house agency 4Creative. Tagholm said:

“We knew we had to make some noise. We knew we had to add some edge and grit and attitude.

“We narrowed it down to four or five concepts but then someone came up with this line: ‘Meet The Superhumans’. We loved the scale and the confidence of it. So we built up from there to create the strongest, most impactful concept we could get.”

The Channel 4 blog puts it like this:

“As for the scenes in the middle with the explosion and car crash and the mother in the hospital – we thought long and hard about how to include them because one thing that we weren’t interested at all in doing was an advert which said ‘Isn’t it great that these guys have made it to the start line?’ That just didn’t interest me and I don’t think it interested the channel.

“What I wanted to do though was just get a flashback moment – to show that it’s a part of what they are now and a part of their physicality. I didn’t want to dwell on it, just to give a hint, a moment of just how tough these characters have had to be. I could have put those scenes at the beginning or the end of the trailer but I think it’d have been weirdly less impactful that way – having them where they are stops you right in your tracks and hits you in the face.”

And the Public Image soundtrack nails it.

Sports Bet CommBank parody TV ad

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It was bound to happen given the earnest nature of the initial Toni Collette effort.

A bit cheeky, but fun for a tactical moment.

The bank is now investigating whether the parody breaches its intellectual property rights. You would not want to get into a legal battle with these billionaire bankers.

Clearly Commbank spotted this parody very quickly, unlike it’s appalling and “unapproved” Backpack Bomb hoax ad that aired on-line for the Olympics.

The parody has now been removed courtesy of Commbank.