Bonds shop your shape – mens Quick Dry versus the No Rides TV ad

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I’ve long been a fan of Bonds work.

The ads are all well branded – the style is itself a brand attribute with good music and lots of model movement in a signature Bonds fun fashion (roller-skating being a good example).

Bonds are featuring the Comfy Tops and Hipster No Shows for women and the No Rides for men.

The campaign, called Versus, pits the new shapes against one another and tells the consumer to “Shop Your Shape”.

It is clear, simple and direct as well as very well produced for the target. Essentially a great product demonstration which is at the heart of many good ads. Boys want to be these guys and girls want to be with these guys.

A similar approach to the ads featuring girls

I get the “no rides” classic Hipsters (as featured in their girl band ad with attitude) and “comfy tops”.

My only question is the “quick dry” range for men…?

Either way more good work from Bonds following in the footsteps of their last baby ad – Zip It. with Devo.

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ABC Breakfast News Lego Sally Pearson Olympics win

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LEGO logo

We all know about the restrictions over the use of Olympics footage by broadcasters who don’t have rights.

The still images of Olympic glory just don’t do it by the second Olympic week and therefore a few media outlests including ABC News, The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian have turned to Lego.

I’m a Billund Brick fan since the age of 4. Few brands stick with you for this long and can re-invent themselves and remain relevant and truly interesting to the older and newer generations. A Lego VW Combi van did it for me, not to mention the promise of a Lego action movie no less.

You’ve got to love the fact that the professionals turn to the humble brick with some amateur athletic endeavors when all else fails.

Here are some of the best bits of brick from Legos 80th Anniversary year:

Lego Story Animation 

Lego Outback Forest

Lego Australian 50th Anniversary

 

The LEGO Story – celebrating 80 years

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LEGO Headquarters, Billund Denmark

I’m a big fan of the Billund bricks as a few previous posts show.

Their 80th anniversary year is proving to be a significant milestone in product and promotion.

Here is a lengthy but completely engaging animated video telling the Lego story in a memorable and motivating way.

It describes the life of Ole Kirk Christiansen, who created the company in 1932 with his son Godtfred, Lego’s second owner, all narrated from the perspective of the founder’s grandson and current owner Kjeld.

The video delightfully describes the trials and tribulations of the company and how they came up with the name Lego  from the Danish “leg godt” which means “play well” as well as “I put together” in Latin.

It’s great to see a brand really proud of it’s provenance and confident enough to produce something like this.

Bust out the Beanz – Heinz Baked Beanz TV ad

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Here is a truly iconic brand that has consistently been in shopping baskets since first sold in Fortnum & Mason in 1901.

Most of us still associate it with the famous 1967 “Beanz Meanz Heinz” slogan created by advertising executive Maurice Drake.

In other words it is a true perennial that is still in most households.

I love this ad because it shows some proper insight on the shopper. It relies on the fact that most of us have a can, but many of us have lapsed with our usage if not love of the beleaguered bean.

The message immediately resonates with the viewer. It reminds us of a neglected friend hidden away that deserves better!

Tom Ward, head of strategy and insights at GPY&R, said:

“The problem is that all too often that is where they stay, to the point that people will sometimes end up with two or three cans tucked away.”

This sort of genuine shopper insight is great to see. Hopefully the campaign will grow as we see how people have rekindled their love affair and bust out the beautiful bean…

U by Kotex leakage freakage

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Kimberley Clark are going out of their way to push the problem.

It might be “leakage” or it could be the risk of attracting dogs by virtue of an unclean bum (ref Kleenex Cottonelle).

This latest effort is confronting women with what we are told is a common problem. The solution is U by Kotex.

In both cases the company tackles the problem with clear product solutions.

Both approaches and that of Carefree raise an interesting question. Do consumers respond better to direct, descriptive advertising and what level of directness is more effective? The word “vagina” has recently been a subject of many complaints regarding the advertising campaign for Carefree Actifresh.

It’s interesting to ask if this approach researches well with all women / consumers? The industry likes to trumpet from on high and say we MUST change the consumer – “better out than in!” and remove ourselves from these suppressed notions of discrete advertising…? A vocal minority applaud the use of language that can make mums and dads cringe into their sofa. “It’s a vaginal discharge so lets herald it from on high!”. I’m not so sure.

There is a subtle balance between being direct and being overtly confronting to women and families in their own living rooms. U, which is firmly youth targeted, gets it right. We aren’t shocked into awareness of the problem and efficacy of the solution, we don’t hear language that is too confronting and we are indirectly very aware of the problem without being told that it is a “vaginal discharge”…territory other brands would prefer to own.

At the end of the day it is about understanding the audience not just the user and when it is the mass medium of TV the family audience matters. This is why it is an interesting topic for discussion when used in mass market media (rather than more directly targeted communication).

Without being overly conservative I sincerely hope that brands don’t continue to reach for stand-out notoriety by the use of the lowest creative common denominators in overtly describing what many real people consider to be discrete categories.

The true creative challenge is to communicate the problem and benefit / solution without the reliance on the literal descriptions and language.

Curiosity Oreo Red – Mars Rover landing press ad

Oreo has become cool.

A diminutive biscuit (cookie…) that hasn’t changed much about it’s appearance in 100 years is re-inventing itself.

More than that, it is reformulating its advertising as well as it’s ingredients.

This ad does a nice job of making Oreo a bit more topical courtesy of the Mars Rover landing on the red planet.

The Curiosity Oreo is not available in stores which is a bit of a blip in the strategy. Even as a PR giveaway it would have been outstanding.

The red cookie follows in the footsteps of a previous space-themed, boot-printed cookie in honor of the July 20th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s inaugural walk on the surface of the moon. And it is part of a much longer Daily Twist campaign.

A rainbow cream stacked Gay Pride-themed Oreo drew over 65,500 comments (both supportive and opposing) on the company’s Facebook page and was shared nearly 300,000 times.

Nicely understated and gaining popularity on-line!