Motorcycle reconstruction – TAC road safety TV Campaign – “Slowing Down Won’t Kill You”

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I ride a bike and have done for many years. I also drive a car.

I therefore notice the campaigns to keep riders safe – those that encourage car drivers to check the blind-spot etc.

The best was still “think once, think twice, think bike” aimed at car drivers who “didn’t see the bike…” before they turned into it.

This ad is one of the worst kind. It depicts the biker as the only one at fault and yet again ignores the role of the car driver.

As written in the Age yesterday: “But nowhere is there any criticism of the driver who has caused an accident by failing to give way when facing a stop sign. There is not a hint of it. There is, instead, a subtext that it is all the rider’s fault, that since he was speeding, the driver can be exonerated entirely.”

I get that it is aimed at speeding bikers, but for a client that should know better, this ad and depicted situation, will alienate all bikers who understand the constant threat of cars turning into their path.

Amazing lack of insight into the both the problem and target.

If it is speed you want to curb, then show the perils of hitting a corner too quickly, not the perils of avoiding cars turning into you without looking!

Ironic that a SupaCheap auto ad does it better than the TAC: http://youtu.be/z8mOX8PdtOU

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/giving-way-on-the-road-wont-kill-you-either-20120509-1yczr.html#ixzz1uWln6pg2

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Lynx Anarchy Invisible ad in Sydney House

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Lynx have been successfully using activation stunts to great effect (ref Virtual Fallen Angels posted earlier).

They get the technology and apply it in a way that drives the PR around the brand and builds brand fame. Even after all these years it still breaks new ground with innovative ideas and causes a stir.

This keeps it fresh and relevant to the target and is integrated into the creative in more traditional media work.

Soap were responsible for this and ECD Brad Eldridge said: “We wanted to create something as disruptive and innovative as the product itself. We used a clever hack combining LCD screens and polaroid glasses to create something that extends the campaign in an innovative and unique way.”