That Dick Smith Australia Day Ad

PR stunt perhaps? But more seriously, a poor and very amateur attempt at advertising. Many comments in social media hark back to a more ‘open’ time in 1970 something. Exactly. And the charity sign-off doesn’t excuse the execution.

Nickie de Jager VW make-up whilst driving YouTube ad

Video

It is all too rare to see an arresting ad that has this sort of impact with a precisely targeted group.

If you didn’t know what was coming (as most viewers don’t on Nickie’s site), the impact is phenomenal.

The genius in this ad is to get the creative idea beautifully executed and placed in the most relevant, well targeted place possible – Nickie de Jagger’s YouTube site.

This is VW creating a relevant and motivating connection with drivers.

VW are one of the most impressive companies at this sort of big idea based advertising. A few classic examples:

VW deepest bin and VW Stairs from their fun theory creative site.

The video can originally be found in Nickie’s channel Nickie Tutorials 

Thanks to Gruen for getting this one on-air.

Bonds Shop Your Shape The Comfy Tops versus The Tails

Video

More good work from the Bonds pants people.

The same campaign, with a touch more attitude.

Bonds Shop Your Shape Hipsters vs No Show TV ad

Video

I’ve posted a succession of great Bonds work.

It is one of the best examples of campaign consistency. Sexy, fun ads for the target that are really great product demonstrations. Relevant, interesting and motivating from an emotional and rational point of view.

The Bonds Industries logo

All with well crafted soundtracks (particularly the Baby “Zip It” work). And great product names / descriptors. Simple, but effective.

I hope with the changes at the company they stick to the plan – all too often the need for change in a campaign can be client rather than consumer.

Bonds remain a cool and clever brand.

Some other examples: blokes, babies, hipsters, rollers, others

Tourism Australia Great Southern land TV ad

Video

Tourism Australia and Qantas have rejigged Icehouse singer Iva Davies Great Southern Land track.

The aim is to sell Australia to tourists.

The first thing that surprises me is that this is more music video than tourist ad?

The second thing is that It will run online only, including Twitter and TA’s Facebook page.

And this is on the back of DDB’s most recent incarnation of the There’s Nothing Like Australia campaign, which cost $4m to produce.

I’m not convinced that a song which means more to Australians than any other nation, sung by artists mainly recognizable only by Australians will attract a flood of foreigners?

And no surfing on golden beaches?

This will have to work very hard via social media if it is to attract the traveler in the face of a strengthening Aussie dollar and I can’t help thinking it is another montage of nice shots and song rather than a strategic advertising effort.

Toyota Auris Japanese Transgender car ad

 

This ad is getting a lot of discussion going outside of its exclusive airing in Japan.

The ad features 19-year-old Stav Strashko, who identifies as transgender. The tagline for the campaign is, “not in trend, not casual, not for everyone, not authority, but Auris”

One lesson in advertising (particularly car ads) is make the product / car the star.

This ad is both awkward for its use of a niche personality to sell a mass market product and also fails on presenting anything about the product – I don’t buy the ‘hybrid’ body / car analogy.

It gets attention, but for all the wrong reasons and does little to sell the product. Not relevant, interesting or motivating for the category or target and gratuitous in its use of talent.

 

IKEA Baby Whisperer screaming TV ad

Video

English: Logo of Ikea.

This is a funny ad, particularly for all the parents out there.

But it also continues in the IKEA tradition of delivering the simple proposition of low prices and decent quality (value).

It is a rare example of an arresting bit of creative that gets your attention and ensures that you remember the advertising message.

Nice work by The Monkeys.

U by Kotex leakage freakage

Video

Kimberley Clark are going out of their way to push the problem.

It might be “leakage” or it could be the risk of attracting dogs by virtue of an unclean bum (ref Kleenex Cottonelle).

This latest effort is confronting women with what we are told is a common problem. The solution is U by Kotex.

In both cases the company tackles the problem with clear product solutions.

Both approaches and that of Carefree raise an interesting question. Do consumers respond better to direct, descriptive advertising and what level of directness is more effective? The word “vagina” has recently been a subject of many complaints regarding the advertising campaign for Carefree Actifresh.

It’s interesting to ask if this approach researches well with all women / consumers? The industry likes to trumpet from on high and say we MUST change the consumer – “better out than in!” and remove ourselves from these suppressed notions of discrete advertising…? A vocal minority applaud the use of language that can make mums and dads cringe into their sofa. “It’s a vaginal discharge so lets herald it from on high!”. I’m not so sure.

There is a subtle balance between being direct and being overtly confronting to women and families in their own living rooms. U, which is firmly youth targeted, gets it right. We aren’t shocked into awareness of the problem and efficacy of the solution, we don’t hear language that is too confronting and we are indirectly very aware of the problem without being told that it is a “vaginal discharge”…territory other brands would prefer to own.

At the end of the day it is about understanding the audience not just the user and when it is the mass medium of TV the family audience matters. This is why it is an interesting topic for discussion when used in mass market media (rather than more directly targeted communication).

Without being overly conservative I sincerely hope that brands don’t continue to reach for stand-out notoriety by the use of the lowest creative common denominators in overtly describing what many real people consider to be discrete categories.

The true creative challenge is to communicate the problem and benefit / solution without the reliance on the literal descriptions and language.

Curiosity Oreo Red – Mars Rover landing press ad

Oreo has become cool.

A diminutive biscuit (cookie…) that hasn’t changed much about it’s appearance in 100 years is re-inventing itself.

More than that, it is reformulating its advertising as well as it’s ingredients.

This ad does a nice job of making Oreo a bit more topical courtesy of the Mars Rover landing on the red planet.

The Curiosity Oreo is not available in stores which is a bit of a blip in the strategy. Even as a PR giveaway it would have been outstanding.

The red cookie follows in the footsteps of a previous space-themed, boot-printed cookie in honor of the July 20th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s inaugural walk on the surface of the moon. And it is part of a much longer Daily Twist campaign.

A rainbow cream stacked Gay Pride-themed Oreo drew over 65,500 comments (both supportive and opposing) on the company’s Facebook page and was shared nearly 300,000 times.

Nicely understated and gaining popularity on-line!

OXY – Zit popping man sized problems

Video

Please note – I wouldn’t look at this if you’ve got food on your mind! It contains explicit zit popping material.

A while ago an almost surgical excising of a zit became an internet viral hit – the on-line pimple squeezing got a lot of views. 5 million endured the 3 minutes in full glory.

Some of those unforgettable moments are in this piece from Naked Comms in Sydney together with a multitude of other zit popping moments.

The venerable Adam Ferrier said:

“We pride ourselves on finding the right solution to the presenting problem. This video, although difficult to watch for some, will tickle the target markets interest and get people to try Oxy.

“The idea came from the simple insight that guys like watching videos of guys squeezing big pimples. It speaks to our target much more authentically than the glossy, cheesy work of Oxy’s big spending competitors. We believe this work will result in mass trial of the brand, and change consumer behaviour towards Oxy.”

An age ago I worked on the brand when it was with SmithKlineBeecham. We thought ourselves somewhat revolutionary for introducing the word “zit” into our ads – famously coining the line “Blitz those Zits with Oxy”. It did well as it appealed to the target in their terms versus Clearasil which was still talking “cleansing”.

That was prior to the connected revolution the target enjoy today so I think it is probably a very smart strategy to re-calibrate the conversation (on-line at least) and show the true gory glory to the target.

The on-line piece concludes on a free sample afer the “man sized” message – it works and should generate trial if it reaches enough people. My only add-on would have been something a bit more brand centric about to close…something like:

“Blitz those Zits with Oxy…”

New Old Spice Olympics ad – “I will live forever”.

Video

I liked the last set of ads P&G released for the brand. They were in keeping with the “Smell like a Man” theme of previous work and had the same nicely edited touch.

But this work is a head scratcher?

The same tune is applied to what I think is quite a different idea and I’m left wondering if this is stretching the original creative premise too far just to shoe horn in the Olympics reference? It doesn’t really work as part of the previous idea or as a stand alone.

Particularly after P&G did such an original and classy job with Olympic mums?

Perhaps this is a case of “Too much of a good thing” regarding Smell Like A Man theming, and P&G need to find a more original way to build on their classic work if the brand is going to continue to re-establish itself.

New Qantas TV ad – “you’re the reason we fly”

Video

2007 to present

After much anticipation the new Qantas campaign has launched.

The ad features the new tagline “You’re the reason we fly” with a Daniel Johns track, titled “Atlas”. Somewhat put in the shade by the latest Telstra “Land Down Under” track. The ad also has a new logo, a compilation of 22,000 Australian faces which make up the flying kangaroo.

It’s interesting that the campaign has dropped the famous song “I still call Australia Home” and has also moved away from iconic Australian images.

Featuring real people is a “see-through” strategy to ensure that “real” people feel that this is their airline (and that’s the reason they fly…). It hopes to be relevant to them and that they will relate to it. As an iconic national carrier, that has arguably lost it’s way, this is quite a risk. The notional change from “Australia’s” to “Australian‘s” airline indicated that this was coming.

The question is what does the ad do to either inspire people afresh or change attitudes? And there is a bit of a negative mountain to climb in many travelers minds both perceived (press negativity) and experienced (the entertainment isn’t working, it’s late again etc)

Emotionally it engages through the everyday people it hopes to be relevant to. Some nice shots and as you would expect beautifully produced. The launch campaign is customer-focused, featuring Australian’s from the coast, the cities and the country, a destination-based TVC will follow.

Unfortunately the depiction of everyday people is somewhat generic. The “reasons to believe” or think differently about the carrier are absent.

I believe advertising must have a creative message that sells (really!). I’m not sure what I am asked to buy in this ad or what attitude I am expected to change? In other words it is generic.

The previous ad famously became an anthem for all that was great about Australia (and delivered by Qantas).

This seems to lack any proprietary backbone in terms of what is unique about Qantas. Owning the place was one thing that resonated as it is a national carrier going to all parts of the country (less true these days). Owning the people is quite a different proposition that relies on delivering superb service which judging from on-line comments is somewhat lacking of late.

In comparison to the Virgin ad which stressed a fast pace and determined approach to service (…showing staff, service and boasting a lot of planes no less!), this ad falls short on delivering a message that you can grab hold of and believe in. At this stage in the brand journey, people need a bit more substance to believe in.

The compilation logo treatment has a lot more style than substance and is perhaps too wrapped up in the strategy of “Australian’s” versus a clear depiction of the logo, particularly when there are no other clear brand references in the ad – I believe that you can never assume that everyone seeing it knows who it is for.

I completely get where the ad is trying to position the brand, I’m just not sure it is as convincing as it needs to be.

As a recent article put it the new generation of traveller has no emotional attachment to Qantas and its wider significance to the country, also suggesting that:

Qantas is coming home to an empty house, with a sign pinned to the fridge saying, “Your chicken dinner – or beef dinner if we cannot fulfil your first choice – is in the dog” and an ever-growing stack of bills to pay.

A lot of work to be done to change hearts and minds.

Qantas has said that the TVCs are designed to tug on the “heart strings” and to “re-engage emotionally with consumers”.

The final stage of the campaign, which Qantas has labelled the ‘prove’ segment, will make up the lions-share of the rebrand efforts.

Is this another example of the consumer being gently introduced into the sell via a soft emotionally charged entrée? It seems to be a trend amongst bigger budget brands to “engage” emotionally first then sell second with proof points (Commonwealth Bank, Virgin Mobile, Woolworth’s etc).

The cynical might suggest this could be a clever sales tactic by agencies. But I think it is flawed to assume that consumers are interested enough to stay with brands through these different phases (and connect them). The better option is surely to make a single ad (or connected campaign) which can receive significant weight and generate the desired impact emotionally AND rationally (Hyundai, Cannon, The Guardian etc)

The team at Qantas are skilled marketeers with broad budgets and I hope that the rational reasons to fly with them (the proof) will be delivered in the next ad against this emotionally staged backdrop of relating to everyday people.

The problem with this execution is a basic one – marketing 101 really:

“what is actually proprietary and unique about this ad”?

The answer is very little. Added to which, the ‘You’re The Reason We Fly‘ tagline is exactly the same wording used by the now-defunct Carnival Airlines in the USA.

As reported in AdNews, creative leaders have not suggested Qantas plagiarised the positioning, they have chastised the company for using a “generic” statement that could have been used before, and for “not doing their homework”.

McCann executive creative director John Mescall told AdNews: “It’s not surprising this has happened because it is such a generic motherhood statement. This is laziness not plagiarism.

A lazy, generic approach to advertising and the assumption that consumers will be interested enough in the emotional “art” to act or change opinions, shows a lack of insight into the consumer, the category and a lack of belief in the brand’s selling points (which are absent).

Ultimately everyday people will judge this work versus the previous iconic work and more importantly, they will judge the airline by the delivery of a decent service in a highly competitive market.

Unfortunately, I think that this work will fly by them relatively unnoticed.

Kleenex Gripples toilet roll TV ad – dog sniffs bums

Video

We now firmly understand that a labrador puppy is the spokes-dog for toilet paper.

Usually he sprukes soft, strong and very, very long. And because he is soft and cuddly, we naturally assume that the product has similar qualities. We don’t often question if these are the properties that make it the best toilet paper, probably because it’s not something we choose to debate and discuss.

So it’s interesting to see Kleenex apply this more direct approach to the category.

Basically, does your bum smell?

After the initial shock of being confronted by such a direct accusation, we can consider what the ad is trying to do.

The cute puppy, is now less interested in playing with toilet rolls and is more interested in being a dog and smelling bums. Those that use Kleenex pass the test. Those that don’t get a yelp of terror from our cute character assassin.

Kleenex have made one concession to our potential embarrassment by making up a new word for textured toilet paper – gripples. To me it sounds a bit like a grade of sandpaper and perhaps not as cumfy as it is meant to. They are trading off this imaginative invention:

Here is what the company says in a press release from Kimberly-Clark:

“While a little edgier than previous Kleenex Cottonelle brand campaigns, the aim is to attract more premium brand switchers, who represent 60% of the market, by communicating the strength of Kleenex Cottonelle as well as the softness it’s renowned for.”

Marketing manager for Kleenex Cottonelle brand, Michelle Rossier said:

‘People use personal care products to feel clean and fresh all day, however they don’t connect this feeling to the toilet tissue they buy. The new campaign positions Kleenex Cottonelle brand as the toilet tissue that provides you with a superior level of clean.”

On the one hand (pun intended) this is a very different move in the category. It will get noticed.

On the other, do people want to be confronted by such a direct message?

My view is that it works to build awareness, but NOT brand engagement amongst the mass market. It has the cute credentials of the puppy to defuse a very direct commentary on hygiene and might perhaps, through the innovative invention of gripples, combine enough rational reasons with the emotion of our previously polite puppy to put this brand at the top of the shopping list. But that is a big “might” in the mass market shopping aisle.

Whilst it is great to see some difference in one of those tricky categories, I think this is missing the true insight on real consumer attitudes and the client has been sold “difference” against “effectiveness”.

The association to a dog sniffing a bum (and what we mean here is poo!) is at odds with what consumers want from the category – i.e. discretion and effectiveness without the overt reference to usage. No one wants to badge themselves in this category!

Just like the Care Free “Vagina” ad, the literal use of contentious words and actions becomes gratuitous and actually isn’t big or clever from a creative point of view. Very few brands successfully shock us into the sell – despite a creative belief that the notoriety of contentious / confronting ads will increase appeal.

As a footnote, I understand that there has been an immediate sales impact on Kleenex. And not a good one. Bummer.

 

Woolworths Supervisor Jillian Arnold and Truckie Harold Haigh

Video

Having seen the launch campaign, many anticipated a more functional follow-up to the campaign in these individual character spots.

How many trucks does it take to get it there fresh?

How quickly do onions get from the soil to the store?

In fact the curious potato farmer delivers some of this in terms of a truth about how the potatoes are cleaned.

The aim is to provide detailed backstories with the aim of personalising the quality and quantity of Australian produce and local sustainability promoted by Woolworths.

The issue is how many potential shoppers feel that an engaging character alone can convince them of the Fresh Food People claim? Particularly in the absence of any product info. about quality?

They are beautifully produced, but do they change hearts and minds when it comes to the store and the claim “Fresh Food People”? I’m not so sure.

The best ad from Cannes – Guardian open journalism: “Three Little Pigs” TV ad – the Guardian

Video

Logo of the British newspaper The Guardian

The Guardian newspaper in the UK has a long history of great advertising.

The classic Points of View TV ad is one of the best.

This ad (even at 2 minutes) is my choice from Cannes, although it didn’t bring home the bacon in terms of awards…

It communicates a complicated message of the breadth of Guardian coverage through a brilliantly constructed creative examination of a story we all know. Entertaining, interesting, relevant and motivating by underpinning the credentials of a great paper that is still innovating in the digital world.

A very different perspective and very much what the Guardian brand stands for.

McCann Melbourne creative director Annie Price.

Price has urged Aussie marketers and agencies against treating people like “idiots”, and has held up the highly regarded ‘The Little Pigs’ campaign by BBH as an example of the type of advertising the local industry should be striving for.

She told AdNews: “There’s not much Australian advertising can’t learn from this stunning commercial.

“It’s intelligent. It’s entertaining. It’s beautifully produced and so gripping, it has you coming back for more and more. It really is storytelling at its finest. There’s no doubt who it’s for and you’re left feeling compelled to go and buy a paper.

“It’s the intelligence of the Guardian commercial that most impressed me.

“No denying we make some great ads in Oz.

“But sadly, Australian TV screens are still full of a disproportional amount of commercials that treat people like idiots. Ads that assume that we are sitting there on the edge of our seats, just waiting to be informed about toilet cleaner, muesli bars or moisturiser by a moronic presenter. It’s 1950s advertising without the lovely retro outfits and atomic burst laminate.

“Clients and agencies alike would do well to remember that consumers are getting their information from so many sources nowadays, TV is not king. For us to truly impact on someone’s life via TV, and make a real connection, we’d better be smart about it and we’d better not insult his or her intelligence.”

Hyundai New Generation i30 “Free Yourself” – “I want to break free” with Queen TV ad

Video

Here’s something that doesn’t demand too much thought.

Hyundai are pitching freedom.

Maybe not that unique when it comes to cars, but nice to see a more creative execution rather than the happy family / cafe couple that we usually get bored by.

Innocean creative director Scott Lambert  said that the ad represented a departure from Hyundai’s traditionally “sophisticated, clean style of commercial for a more emotive feel”, with more colour and tone than the brand usually employs.

The rights to the music cost “around $200,000″ – so we might be seeing more of this…and at least at that cost the music is central to the creative idea. The supercut editing is nicely done and you get a look at the car and features – the sun-roof, radio etc. All done in a way that entertains and communicates.

A bit more real and a lot more noticeable.

Carlsberg Euro 2012 Fan Academy TV ad. Probably the best football ad this year?

Video

You probably need to be English to get the most out of this. Which in itself is a great compliment to the spot – it nails the England fan mentality.

There are also very good choices in casting: headed by Des Lynam featuring England legends Bobby Charlton, Peter Shilton, Stuart Pearce and Ian Wright; actor Brian Blessed; ex-Olympic gold medallist Linford Christie; explorer Ray Mears; and TV presenter Helen Chamberlain serving pies.

But at the end of the day, stirring that in-built passion for the great game is going to bring rewards.

You might even feel that Carlsberg are in this one with you…before you realize that it is Danish brewing company founded in 1847 by J. C. Jacobsen after the name of his son Carl. Not very English really.

Interesting to see Carlsberg getting it right for the market and continuing a strong campaign of understanding who they are talking to. The watchability is great (to the England fan at least!)

Motorcycle reconstruction – TAC road safety TV Campaign – “Slowing Down Won’t Kill You”

Video

I ride a bike and have done for many years. I also drive a car.

I therefore notice the campaigns to keep riders safe – those that encourage car drivers to check the blind-spot etc.

The best was still “think once, think twice, think bike” aimed at car drivers who “didn’t see the bike…” before they turned into it.

This ad is one of the worst kind. It depicts the biker as the only one at fault and yet again ignores the role of the car driver.

As written in the Age yesterday: “But nowhere is there any criticism of the driver who has caused an accident by failing to give way when facing a stop sign. There is not a hint of it. There is, instead, a subtext that it is all the rider’s fault, that since he was speeding, the driver can be exonerated entirely.”

I get that it is aimed at speeding bikers, but for a client that should know better, this ad and depicted situation, will alienate all bikers who understand the constant threat of cars turning into their path.

Amazing lack of insight into the both the problem and target.

If it is speed you want to curb, then show the perils of hitting a corner too quickly, not the perils of avoiding cars turning into you without looking!

Ironic that a SupaCheap auto ad does it better than the TAC: http://youtu.be/z8mOX8PdtOU

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/giving-way-on-the-road-wont-kill-you-either-20120509-1yczr.html#ixzz1uWln6pg2

Vitek Vodka “Parkour” ad – “distilled by peasants drunk by royalty”

Video

Here’s an interesting one.

My initial thoughts were as follows…A send up of “Parkour” runs as a nice piece of entertainment – it does engage you in the story and the inevitable conclusion. The question is does this build brand awareness for Vitek and give you any reason to buy?

Is it really motivating to suggest that the brand is distilled by Peasants and drunk by Royalty? (I keep thinking about hygiene issues). I’m also not sure that the “made in Australia” claim sits well with the brand positioning around Polish distillers?

There is a series of these and we are encouraged to believe that the distillers, whilst expert in making the vodka, are a bit eccentric when it comes to other skills. Presumably through their single minded dedication to the art of making vodka.

If there was some indication as to why we might believe that the Polish peasant brewers are the best distillers it would help.

Perhaps I’m being a bit too literal and critical, but I do feel that the motivation is lacking to buy the brand when there are so many other alternatives.

So given my skepticism, I went on-line to find out more and uncovered a convenient brand truth!

This is an on-line venture and in his own words goes like this:

“My name is Vitek, I was born in Poland, and grew up watching my father not only infusing vodka but also distilling it. So by the time I was a teenager, I knew how to put a bag of potatoes into a bottle.

Regardless of what I was doing professionally I always considered vodka a hobby – until now – suddenly it’s a job and a business.

Like all hobbies you become a bit of an authority on the subject and today I am regarded – in all modesty – as one of Australia’s leading vodka experts.
By applying traditional infusion methods that have been in our family for generations, to a contemporary product, I have created a range of fresh produce vodkas that have received both critical and commercial acclaim. They are Rose, Coffee and Strawberry.

Vitek Vodkas are purposely at 25% A/V because they are designed to be enjoyed for their flavour. They can be drunk with food, as a sipping drink or just hanging out with friends – much like wine. Doing that at 40% A/V, which most vodka is, would get you so trashed you would be losing friends instead of making them.

Like all vodka, Vitek Vodka should be drunk very cold. Put it in a freezer for a couple of hours or in the fridge for several hours before you drink it. Come in, have a look around and get real with the only flavoured vodka that’s made from real ingredients not chemicals.”

I then spotted some magazine articles (Vogue no less!) on Vitek and was left wondering why the ads don’t bring more of this marvelous provenance and product differentiation to life! There is some creative gold in the Rose, Chocolate, Coffee and Strawberry frozen sipping infusions, as the magazine articles point out.

Couple this to a genuinely interesting and innovative website and the product differentiation leaps out at you.

From skeptic to fan in a matter of clicks.

A sin to say it (..to some), but perhaps spending more on the PR campaign will build this into a bigger and better proposition!

There will be stories “Welcome to the Jungle” – Sydney’s Star Casino ad

Video

Rarely do you come across TV work where you are intrigued enough to really want to watch it through and see who or what it is advertising.

This is one of those rare ads – nicely shot of course and wonderfully cast ( a genuine legend in Bill Baker and a large cast at that…), with a nod perhaps to Fat Boy Slim’s “Weapon of Choice” video featuring Christopher Walken? http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ZM1fkHQP_Pw

Heaps of watchability in repeat viewing – spotting the Ducatti in the pool, red Ferrari, Hippy, Emu line up and more.

Welcome to the Jungle – is a nice touch. Relevant to what they are selling and a nice re-imagining of the Guns n Roses original.

Good work from the Monkeys in Sydney

As an interesting post script – debate is raging in the trade press (ref. B&T) following Richard Chees’e claim of plagiarism on the music. The Monkeys have strongly denied this.

Here is his version and his Facebook page is pretty much to the point in terms of his opinion…

http://www.facebook.com/richardcheese: “Wtf. Wtf??????? Wtf!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is a commercial for some casino in Australia, and they ripped off my “Welcome To The Jungle” arrangement!!!!!!!!!!! You shonky ratbags!!! I’ll tell you right now, this shall not go unpunished. Crikey!!!”

Cadbury Dairy Milk “Joyville” Tv ad

Video

We all know Gorilla, and many love the glass and a half off-beat view of chocolate making. My favourite is still Bubbly with Nena and her luftballoons (as previously posted here)

The Willy Wonker-ish premise is something everyone can relate to and there are glimpses of nicely cast characters, but does it give you the same feeling of satisfaction and surprise as the others?

One of the successes of the other executions was that they prompted a conversation – either “have you seen” or “how did they do that” in the case of glass and a half.

One of the great successes of their campaigns overall is branding – you know from the very first scene that the colour is Cadbury – brilliant job on owning the colour.

However, owning Wonker territory perhaps demands a more “Tim Burton” view of the world.

I feel that Joyville is a cracking premise / idea, but I would have liked an even more quirky execution to leave me wanting to see it again and talk about it. I think that this could develop nicely.

(Disclaimer: I am addicted to the product and love all things Cadbury)

Woolworths Select chips ad

Here’s an interesting development in the Battle of the Supermarket Brands.

Versus previous offerings on the Select range, this one has a bit more added fun for the family.

It will be interesting to see how it does against the Dawn French series and which tone of voice comes out on top. Personally I still feel it is all about the shopper empathizing with the characters. This one features the punter who doesn’t work for anyone…the best thing is that we are seeing some new creative in the category!

Dawn French does Curtis Stone for Coles…

This is a nice fresh addition to the campaign…what I really like is that you can imagine Mrs (or Mr.!) shopper really liking this. A bit of a slap and tickle laugh…much more of the target’s sense of humor and therefore more memorable and motivating.

I hope this develops into more executions and Coles challenger status could be moving into a leadership position in the battle of aisles advertising?

Dawn is receiving a good deal of negative feedback from the industry suggesting that a local star could have done the job? I’m sure that they could, but this is written with Dawn French in mind and she does a great job. I think it adds to the perceived status of Coles to grab a bigger star and one that works so well versus the target.

Woolworths Select ad – Droga change the category

By their own admission, this isn’t the new strategy, just a tactical ad for own label. It communicates the rational product values well, but I wonder if it could have contributed more to the overall Woolworth’s positioning and emotionally connected better?

Is the humour a bit left field for the target? it definitely interrupts a viewer, but the bigger question is will it engage them and give Woolworths a connection to the consumer?

Did that woman blink in the entire ad? Do the kids seem a bit on edge…?

More to come and eagerly awaited as Droga get the strategy going.

Oak Hungry Thirsty

Great work from the Monkeys.

The insight is what kills it for me. love the product and the product doesn’t just do the job on thirst, it’s a full blown chocolate feast of a meal (I do like chocolate…).

Coining “hungry thirsty” is a great way to deliver a message added to which the straightforward, but quirky art direction is innovative and grabs some attention.

The Shit / $#*! kids say

This is interesting. A difficult category at best. I can remember some over engineered and wincingly awkward ads in the past which have shocked people into discussion, but probably not action.

This has a build into a believable and sincere, but subtle message.

The question is what is the objective – awareness, action against suspicion or donation? I think that awareness will build, but I wish it had a harder call to action.

Still a strong piece of work and I hope that whatever DM is associated to the campaign drives a message home.

PS VITA – The World Is In Play

The gaming genre continues to impress.

I particularly like the different target users and games in the ad. The best launch line up ever, including Uncharted Golden Abyss, EA FIFA Football, WipEout 2048 & Little Deviants

The idea of putting you into the action had been around for a while, but the execution is exemplary.

Nike – she runs the night – in fear??

At first sight something worried me in this. A woman running through the night, in the deserted back-streets of an anonymous city didnt depict confidence and wellbeing. The introduction of a prying predator enforced this view.

I get what the ad is trying to say – compete with your friends, dedicate yourself to the task, but there are a lot of negative undertones that cloud the positive messaging. The better ads show getting fit as an aspirational endeavor, rather than a dice with death at midnight…

Gruesome Central Institute of Technology ad goes viral

Worth a look. I get the targeting, but the ending strays into gratuitous gore.
Thanks to mUmBRELLA…
Head of marketing at CIT, Kenley Gordon said in a press release: “Free reign isn’t supposed to mean dismembered limbs. If there’s a next time, I’ll stay on set till the final scene wraps. The youth market is what Henry and Aaron know and judging from the hits, they nailed it.”

Official Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 – The Vet & The noob

The official Call of Duty®: Modern Warfare® 3 live action trailer featuring Sam Worthington, Jonah Hill and Dwight Howard.

21 million views and production values and coverage that major movies would die for. This franchise goes from strength to strength in terms of product and promotion.

Audi ad gets the prize

Much more about a short shelf life for the SuperBowl and hitting the Zeitgeist of a younger generation of aspirational Americans.

I like it for the fact that it sells a feature and presents it in a relevant, interesting way, but they still have some fun with the brand without it being at the brands expense. Fun and effective.

Pedigree Dogs slow-motion ad. Shot @ 1000 FPS using the Phantom camera

It’s dogs in slow-mo catching treats. What could be better.

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This is a phenomenal, yet simple ad. It avoids a lot of those cliched dog running or in the kitchen shots.

Simply put, if you own a dog and buy treats, there is a good chance you really like dogs and the reaction when you give them treats.

Turn this into a wonderfully shot emotive piece of film, add a very well synched sound track and you even tempt those of us without dogs to buy the treats…

Very watchable, memorable and motivating.

“More than a Feeling” for BBH’s Barclaycard roller coaster

Barclaycard have undergone an advertising revolution and made cards fashionable (well at least the benefits in a rollercoaster world).

Following the brilliant “Waterslide” spot we see another perfect product demo. John Hegarty’s BBH do the job better than most

Add a good tune and away you go!

The Man Your Man Could Smell Like Old Spice

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Old Spice, is going through a makeover, with the launch of a fresh online store and “Manmercials”, the Youtube channel. “Smell like a Man, Man”, introduces Isaiah Mustafa, to the range of Old Spice spokesmen.

Very fresh from W&K

Nike – Human Chain

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Clever and different stuff from Nike. As always selling a message in the medium.

Client: Nike
Title: Human Chain

Agency: Wieden+Kennedy, Portland
Creative Directors: Alberto Ponte & Jeff Williams
Copywriter: Jason Bagley
Art Director: Ryan O’Rourke

New Bonds Underwear ad – Hipsters Band.

Bonds make a good ad. Previous posts have featured the skills of Rollerskating ladies in pants targeting youth (and young pre-pubescent boys in particular!)

https://sullieseverything.wordpress.com/2009/08/10/new-bonds-underwear-ad-racey-shapes/

The Campaign Palace have launched a new version for the Hipsters range, specifically targeting ‘So You Think You Can Dance’

A great (and consistent) campaign that will live on-line for some time.

Toshiba Chair – Space Chair Project

Vodpod videos no longer available.

In these days of technical wizardry when anything can be made to seem real, I really, really want to believe (and I do…) that this ad is all that it makes out to be.

It is almost too good an idea for the product.

You suspect the idea was one of those in the mind of a creative just waiting for a brief, but all in all it is wonderfully shot and composed (no V/O) and the pay-off works. The addendum below suggests it was all a strategic move…

Thought provoking and memorable.

As an addendum – nice to see that they posted the proof and a rationale!

M&S Chrimbo – the Christmas ad lives!

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Here is a cracker of a christmas from the good people at M&S.

For all of those who hanker after frost, grey skies, crowded shopping streets, drunken Christmas office parties, Yorkshire puddings, roasted parsnips, sleeping in front of the telly, the Queens speech and the fake pink Christmas trees…

An “Intel Star” TV ad – Sponsors of Tomorrow

Who’s your rock star?

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We all know Intel. They do something clever that makes the PC better at doing what it does and deserving of the label “intel inside”.

The new ad gives an anonymous business personality (the ad was first shown in May 2009).

The genius move is to position their creatives / inventors as Rock Stars in a computer geek world.

I also like the crowd singing the tune we now all know and love.

Memorable, full of personality and convincing of the merits of Intel.

 

Guinness – Bring It To Life – (2009) :90 (UK)

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After much anticipation the new UK Guinness TV work hit the screens last week.

They say:

“Guinness launches its most ambitious ad yet. In a parallel with the way a pint of Guinness is created, the ad shows a group of men bringing “a world to life.”
Taking on the extreme challenge of creating this epic ad, Director Johnny Green recruited an elite team including Oscar winning set designer Grant Major and Oscar nominated Director of Photography Wally Pfisher.”

With a dedicated site: http://www.bringittolife.tv/ for the campaign.

It is of course epic and is underpinned by a lot of justification to the effort (cost) of production:

“It took 3 months of preparation before any filming began in Canada
It took 45 women, 6 days to hand stitch the artificial grass
185 rolls of film were used for the NZ production, one of the largest uses of stock for a commercial filmed in NZ
The glacier shot was filmed at 8,500 feet in NZ
Driveable access to the river location in NZ was uninsurable for vehicles and it took 2.5 hours to cover 45km in 4WD vehicles
The underwater shoot in Fiji took 3 days to complete
It took 3-4 months to build the underwater fish scene and 2-3 weeks to build the winch which pulls up the trees
The NZ team brought in a 20 ton off road crane for the rain spinners and portable dams for the rain effects”

Therefore the facts and figures are impressive, but it seems to have lost the emotional connection of the Good Things Come to Those Who Wait.

I find the copy “Bring this place to life / Bring it to Life” more generic in reference to drinks. Continuity in campaigns can be key when a strong message is central to the communication.

Pure Blonde: “Dove Love”, by Clemenger BBDO

Here’s an entertaining beer Ad (above) featuring the Pure Blonde Dove. Made especially interesting by virtue of seeing the first ad in the series.

In the first installment from 2007 the Dove (below) was used as a bottle opener by the truck driver tearing up the perfect world of Pure Blonde beer.

In the second the Dove, despite the love, still gets a rough time. And just as we thought it was done to appease the Dove Lovers of the world…..

Its tough to stand out from the crowd in this sector, but Clemenger have done a nice job with the series.

New Cadbury “Bubbly” ad, featuring Nena and her 99 Luftballons.

I am a significant fan of Cadbury.

Obviously eating the stuff first and foremost, but I think that their never-ending quest to “own” the color purple and to entertain us in advertising is the stuff of legend.

We all know and love the Gorilla ad featuring the Phil Collins track “in the Air Tonight”, directed by the Sony “Bravia Balls” creative director Juan Cabral of Fallon London. It is quite simply brilliant and will stand the test of time for years to come (it was made in 2007).

Publicis Mojo Melbourne have added a new campaign for Cadbury “Bubbly”.

It features the much loved “99 Luftballons” soundtrack, originally by the german singer Nena in “84 (who incidentally releases a new album this month….).

The appeal is in the fun and delivery of the ad, whilst still getting the message across. I defy anyone not to think of bubbles and purple after this one:

The Australian agency Saatchi & Saatchi, infamously re-edited the classic Fallon Gorilla ad to disastrous effect, adding an appalling John Farnham “You’re the Voice” soundtrack. It was met with absolute derision in social media and didn’t survive long. A testament to the power of the public voice on advertising.

The effect is devastating and can be seen below.

The Remix John Farnham:

And the original by Fallon featuring Phil Collins:

Very worth a mention is the new Zingolo ad from Fallon for Cadbury: Cadbury Dairy Milk – Zingolo ad (Full length – Official Version) 5 mins of music madness!

I’m leaving any mention of “eyebrows” out of the post – over 4 million hits on YouTube shows it was successful, but of more interest is the amount of on-line parodies…Lilly Allen’s being the best:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWEOHd9JNmk&feature=fvw



New Wrangler “Stop Thinking” Campaign

Wrangler is asking consumers to “stop thinking” in a new TV campaign created by Fred & Farid Paris who have done some cracking work for Diesel in the past. The ad, directed by Yannis Rachid, drives consumers to the brand website weareanimals.com.

Moody stuff, but I’m a bit lost on any connection to the Brand.

The website features more moody B/W ads “Why” and “Baby” . The Baby ad is bizarre and in the face of Levis classic BBH ads and Diesel style amongst others, it certainly struggles to sell the brand.

A shame to leave the instilled American heritage behind?

Guinness “Toast to Arthur” celebrating 250 years.

Guinness has made some great ads.

It started 250 years ago (!) and since then, we’ve seen some classic press work around the “Lovely Day for a Guinness”; “Guinness for Strength”; “Guinness Time”; “My Goodness My Guinness” and many, many more.

Added to the history is the truly iconic “Surfer” TV ad directed by Jonathan Glazer, with music by Leftfield and inspiration from Walter Crane‘s 1893 painting “Neptune’s Horses”.

So it is with much anticipation that we look forward to the ads celebrating the 250th anniversary this year.

The campaign by Saatchi and Saatchi is called “Toasts” and features an execution called “Arthur’s Day” (which is apparently the 24th September).

The ad above which toasts Arthur Guinness, the founder of the famous brewery in Dublin ,  features a chinese whispers effect, in which different groups of drinkers mishear a toast to brewery founder Arthur Guinness.

Bizarrely, another straight version of the ad, in which everyone gets Arthur’s name right, will air in some parts of the world.

Perhaps not a classic in the theme of “Surfer”, but I can already see the toast reverberating around bars….

‘Lambstock’ – TV Ad Meat and Livestock Australia


The above ad is getting some good attention and seemed relevant to comment on given the post below featuring Sam from Meat and Livestock Australia fame.

Some say it is weird to suggest that Hippies are BBQ lovers.

Some suggest (anti-drug campaigners) that the reference to “a lamb roll-up” and the mimicking of smoking marijuana is courting controversy.

But the creators of the ad, BMF, say that their tongue is firmly in their cheek and they are celebrating the 40th anniversary of Woodstock. I think that coining “Lambstock” is a great PR move.

It is a fun piece of work for what could arguably be a very dull and predictable category. No sheep in sight. Some great detail in there – the turning of the lamb to the music, the peace sign indicating two ribs please…

The aspect of the campaign that I particularly like is the continuity of the “hippie” theme to on-line, press and outdoor.

The following certainly grabs the attention and links really nicely with the TV:

Forcing a reassessment of Lamb perhaps….? More at:

http://www.themainmeal.com.au/index.htm

All-star lineup for new UK Freeview TV ad

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Freeview advertising inevitably comes under much scrutiny.

It certainly did in Australia where it spawned an infamous spoof.

The UK has just launched a new offering. An unlikely combination of Katie Price, Alan Whicker, Ray Mears and Postman Pat star in a Freeview TV ad set to the theme tune from 1970s UK cop show The Professionals.

The digital terrestrial TV service’s £4m TV campaign as been timed to break on ITV1 during Celebrity Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.

The campaign, by ad agency Beattie McGuinness Bungay, features the “all-star” (?) lineup descending on the house of a Freeview viewer. The confusing point for me is that the claimed objective is to use the campaign to promote the new Freeview + personal video recorder, which I can’t see any reference to? The ad seems to lose it’s way in the face of a barrage of TV celebs.

Personally I think Pat did the best job as he shakes his head suggesting “no bills for you mate…..”

SKY UK “Start of Season” on-air football promo

Continuing the theme from previous posts about strong channel promos for sport (see below), here is another good example from SKY in the UK.

It heralds the start of the season. And similar to those from FOX Sports and ESPN, it makes the most of the visceral emotion of the football fan.

Shot by Mark Harris and from the UK agency Brothers and Sisters, it captures the emotion and anticipation of the season ahead and importantly shows the empathy felt by SKY for a wide range of fans because they “feel the same”.

In other words good emotional stuff from SKY and backed up by their excellent coverage, interactive features and overall production of the games.

The First iPod Promo

Following on from Walkman’s 30th Birthday, it’s worth looking at it’s competition and how it revolutionized the market.

The intro of the iPod in 2001 was followed by some great ads, but also had this promo video for trade and consumers.

Only 8 years ago seems like an age – 5Gb hard drive, 1,000 songs and a B/W screen. The video uses the genuine reactions of Moby and Seal.

Seal says that it reminds him of the first time he picked up a Walkman. Judging by his reaction when he saw this, it was the last time he picked one up.

The lead designer talks about the products potential to become a design icon. Job done.