Sensis 1234 Don’t Say It Text it TV ad

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Here is a really nice succinct creative idea.

You get it. In 16 seconds or less.

I was a fan and then I looked into what you were getting. In essence the text service is just an intermediary to a Google search via the call centre. And it costs to use the service?

Given that 52% of Australians over 16 years of age have an internet enabled smartphone, the service starts to look less appealing and is arguably a premium time saver at best.

An excellent, low cost creative idea, campaign and execution, but perhaps a questionable product benefit.

John West Salmon TV ad – If you go into the woods today…

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The original was a corker, the follow up fishing fellow wasn’t so good.

So we now have a new mega ad – The epic 90 second version of Into the Woods went live on Facebook and YouTube, on October 5th. Stage two is the 30-second pre-launch teaser on prime time TV, October 7th, and 8th, supported by movie listings advertising across News Limited publications. Campaign climax happens mid-October when the 60, 45 and 30-second films go to air on television and cinema screens across Australia.

So all that said and done, is it any good?

I think it lacks the creative impact of the original. This had a cracking creative idea, based around a product truth and packaged up beautifully with a clever bit of humour:

The new version seems to take the premise of “enduring the best” (which was most likely a reverse engineered / post rationalised proposition) and stretched it a bit too far.

More of a story than an ad based on a product truth and a continuation of the creative campaign.

Campaigns are precious things that need to have clear direction and it seems that John West might have lost their mojo in chasing the salmon in this one.

Despite all that, the idea of enduring the worst to bring you the best is solid. A John West Facebook page provides an interactive platform where consumers are encouraged to be their best by sharing their achievements and getting a taste of the epic adventures of others.

But as always, the adventures that John West presents in ads have to remain as relevant, motivating and interesting as possible. Having created some great work, they have a tough job to beat it.

Resident Evil 6 Cries for help – scary trailer

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I’ve posted previously on the power of the game franchises. Here’s a corker from Brothers & Sisters in London – as they say:

We’ve made a proper scary advert. 20 watches and it’s still chilling the bones

Few can compete with Resident Evil.

The movies and games are guaranteed to sell by virtue of the strength and quality of the franchise.

Most studios would bite off their right arm for this sort of selling power.

As we near the release of Resident Evil 6, this quietly terrifying trailer is hitting cinema screens (not to mention the viral overload).

It is brilliant in it’s understated and chilling simplicity and in the way it portrays the point we have reached in the story.

Production values are top class, but like any horror genre, it’s what you don’t see that scares you senseless…and it also looks like the game.

Here’s what they say in the pre-order blurb:

Resident Evil 6 is the dramatic and horrific fear inducing blockbuster entertainment experience of 2012, delivered by The Godfather of Survival Horror.

• 4 closely interwoven scenarios each with their own protagonists and challenges, come together in Resident Evil to reveal the truth about a global bio terrorist attack
• Experience the horror of Resident Evil 6 from three different perspectives. Feel the intense fear as Leon investigates the President’s murder; the horrific action as Chris fights in China and the tension as Jake escapes from Eastern Europe.
• Team up and share the horror of Resident Evil 6 with online co-op action for up to 4 players
• Face unpredictable enemies in Resident Evil 6. Zombies that run, jump and wield weapons plus the deadly J’avo that, when hit mutate into any number of hideous forms.
• Check online stats, progression and compare to friends on the free residentevil.net service

 

‘Like’ on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/residentevil

Follow on Twitter
http://twitter.com/#!/RE_games

Nickie de Jager VW make-up whilst driving YouTube ad

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It is all too rare to see an arresting ad that has this sort of impact with a precisely targeted group.

If you didn’t know what was coming (as most viewers don’t on Nickie’s site), the impact is phenomenal.

The genius in this ad is to get the creative idea beautifully executed and placed in the most relevant, well targeted place possible – Nickie de Jagger’s YouTube site.

This is VW creating a relevant and motivating connection with drivers.

VW are one of the most impressive companies at this sort of big idea based advertising. A few classic examples:

VW deepest bin and VW Stairs from their fun theory creative site.

The video can originally be found in Nickie’s channel Nickie Tutorials 

Thanks to Gruen for getting this one on-air.

The Hyundai moving movie wall by Jonpasang

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To be more precise…2012 Yeosu EXPO HYUNDAI MOTOR GROUP – Hyper-Matrix.

The Hyper-Matrix is comprised of a steel scaffolding and thousands of lightweight, 300mm x 300mm cubes, each attached to its own stepper motor.

Lots of future possibilities with this one.

Bonds Shop Your Shape The Comfy Tops versus The Tails

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More good work from the Bonds pants people.

The same campaign, with a touch more attitude.

Bonds Shop Your Shape Hipsters vs No Show TV ad

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I’ve posted a succession of great Bonds work.

It is one of the best examples of campaign consistency. Sexy, fun ads for the target that are really great product demonstrations. Relevant, interesting and motivating from an emotional and rational point of view.

The Bonds Industries logo

All with well crafted soundtracks (particularly the Baby “Zip It” work). And great product names / descriptors. Simple, but effective.

I hope with the changes at the company they stick to the plan – all too often the need for change in a campaign can be client rather than consumer.

Bonds remain a cool and clever brand.

Some other examples: blokes, babies, hipsters, rollers, others

Carlton Draught Beer Police Chase TV ad

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Clemenger BBDO Melbourne have made a new blokes beer ad. It’s good to see a big ad for a big Aussie brand taking centre stage again.

Enviable ad budgets, blokes, beer, it’s all there, but there is a nice quirky ’80’s movie parody idea behind it that supports Carlton Draught‘s ‘Made From Beer’ positioning. We expect a lot from big brand beer ads and this one delivers.

The ad takes you on an entertaining story and is played out with some nice touches with a good deal of mirth.

If Carlton want to be a bit blokey, young, fun and trendy, then this should work wonders.

A nice touch was the fact it was distributed to the AFL database before it is aired in the ‘footy’ finals on Friday night.

Advertising Agency: Clemenger BBDO, Melbourne, Australia
ECD: Ant Keogh
Art Director: Ant Phillips
Copywriter: Richard Williams
Managing Partner: Paul McMillan
Director: Steve Ayson
Managing Director: Andy Traines
Producer: Cindy Kavanagh
Head of Production: Renee Robson
Production Supervisor: Gus Kousoulas
Editing: The Butchery

NAB Freedom Pizza Big Brother break in

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User big brother 1984

I like this effort from Clemenger BBDO Melbourne for NAB.

It fits with their ‘different’ positioning and actually has a point in terms of the product offering to ‘free’ people from locked in contracts.

Even though it didn’t come off, nice bit of social media work.

Not so convinced of the rationale behind NAB putting a $20,000 reward to the first housemate who chooses to leave the Big Brother house. Surely this could be better spent?

And Big Brother should expect more remote control planes, fly-bys, kites, sign writing and any other form of intrusive, interruptive brand work. Nine were not amused, but isn’t there an advertising opportunity in there somewhere?

Tourism Australia Great Southern land TV ad

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Tourism Australia and Qantas have rejigged Icehouse singer Iva Davies Great Southern Land track.

The aim is to sell Australia to tourists.

The first thing that surprises me is that this is more music video than tourist ad?

The second thing is that It will run online only, including Twitter and TA’s Facebook page.

And this is on the back of DDB’s most recent incarnation of the There’s Nothing Like Australia campaign, which cost $4m to produce.

I’m not convinced that a song which means more to Australians than any other nation, sung by artists mainly recognizable only by Australians will attract a flood of foreigners?

And no surfing on golden beaches?

This will have to work very hard via social media if it is to attract the traveler in the face of a strengthening Aussie dollar and I can’t help thinking it is another montage of nice shots and song rather than a strategic advertising effort.

IKEA Baby Whisperer screaming TV ad

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English: Logo of Ikea.

This is a funny ad, particularly for all the parents out there.

But it also continues in the IKEA tradition of delivering the simple proposition of low prices and decent quality (value).

It is a rare example of an arresting bit of creative that gets your attention and ensures that you remember the advertising message.

Nice work by The Monkeys.

Sports Bet CommBank parody TV ad

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It was bound to happen given the earnest nature of the initial Toni Collette effort.

A bit cheeky, but fun for a tactical moment.

The bank is now investigating whether the parody breaches its intellectual property rights. You would not want to get into a legal battle with these billionaire bankers.

Clearly Commbank spotted this parody very quickly, unlike it’s appalling and “unapproved” Backpack Bomb hoax ad that aired on-line for the Olympics.

The parody has now been removed courtesy of Commbank.

Bonds shop your shape – mens Quick Dry versus the No Rides TV ad

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I’ve long been a fan of Bonds work.

The ads are all well branded – the style is itself a brand attribute with good music and lots of model movement in a signature Bonds fun fashion (roller-skating being a good example).

Bonds are featuring the Comfy Tops and Hipster No Shows for women and the No Rides for men.

The campaign, called Versus, pits the new shapes against one another and tells the consumer to “Shop Your Shape”.

It is clear, simple and direct as well as very well produced for the target. Essentially a great product demonstration which is at the heart of many good ads. Boys want to be these guys and girls want to be with these guys.

A similar approach to the ads featuring girls

I get the “no rides” classic Hipsters (as featured in their girl band ad with attitude) and “comfy tops”.

My only question is the “quick dry” range for men…?

Either way more good work from Bonds following in the footsteps of their last baby ad – Zip It. with Devo.

ABC Breakfast News Lego Sally Pearson Olympics win

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LEGO logo

We all know about the restrictions over the use of Olympics footage by broadcasters who don’t have rights.

The still images of Olympic glory just don’t do it by the second Olympic week and therefore a few media outlests including ABC News, The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian have turned to Lego.

I’m a Billund Brick fan since the age of 4. Few brands stick with you for this long and can re-invent themselves and remain relevant and truly interesting to the older and newer generations. A Lego VW Combi van did it for me, not to mention the promise of a Lego action movie no less.

You’ve got to love the fact that the professionals turn to the humble brick with some amateur athletic endeavors when all else fails.

Here are some of the best bits of brick from Legos 80th Anniversary year:

Lego Story Animation 

Lego Outback Forest

Lego Australian 50th Anniversary

 

The LEGO Story – celebrating 80 years

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LEGO Headquarters, Billund Denmark

I’m a big fan of the Billund bricks as a few previous posts show.

Their 80th anniversary year is proving to be a significant milestone in product and promotion.

Here is a lengthy but completely engaging animated video telling the Lego story in a memorable and motivating way.

It describes the life of Ole Kirk Christiansen, who created the company in 1932 with his son Godtfred, Lego’s second owner, all narrated from the perspective of the founder’s grandson and current owner Kjeld.

The video delightfully describes the trials and tribulations of the company and how they came up with the name Lego  from the Danish “leg godt” which means “play well” as well as “I put together” in Latin.

It’s great to see a brand really proud of it’s provenance and confident enough to produce something like this.

Bust out the Beanz – Heinz Baked Beanz TV ad

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Here is a truly iconic brand that has consistently been in shopping baskets since first sold in Fortnum & Mason in 1901.

Most of us still associate it with the famous 1967 “Beanz Meanz Heinz” slogan created by advertising executive Maurice Drake.

In other words it is a true perennial that is still in most households.

I love this ad because it shows some proper insight on the shopper. It relies on the fact that most of us have a can, but many of us have lapsed with our usage if not love of the beleaguered bean.

The message immediately resonates with the viewer. It reminds us of a neglected friend hidden away that deserves better!

Tom Ward, head of strategy and insights at GPY&R, said:

“The problem is that all too often that is where they stay, to the point that people will sometimes end up with two or three cans tucked away.”

This sort of genuine shopper insight is great to see. Hopefully the campaign will grow as we see how people have rekindled their love affair and bust out the beautiful bean…

U by Kotex leakage freakage

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Kimberley Clark are going out of their way to push the problem.

It might be “leakage” or it could be the risk of attracting dogs by virtue of an unclean bum (ref Kleenex Cottonelle).

This latest effort is confronting women with what we are told is a common problem. The solution is U by Kotex.

In both cases the company tackles the problem with clear product solutions.

Both approaches and that of Carefree raise an interesting question. Do consumers respond better to direct, descriptive advertising and what level of directness is more effective? The word “vagina” has recently been a subject of many complaints regarding the advertising campaign for Carefree Actifresh.

It’s interesting to ask if this approach researches well with all women / consumers? The industry likes to trumpet from on high and say we MUST change the consumer – “better out than in!” and remove ourselves from these suppressed notions of discrete advertising…? A vocal minority applaud the use of language that can make mums and dads cringe into their sofa. “It’s a vaginal discharge so lets herald it from on high!”. I’m not so sure.

There is a subtle balance between being direct and being overtly confronting to women and families in their own living rooms. U, which is firmly youth targeted, gets it right. We aren’t shocked into awareness of the problem and efficacy of the solution, we don’t hear language that is too confronting and we are indirectly very aware of the problem without being told that it is a “vaginal discharge”…territory other brands would prefer to own.

At the end of the day it is about understanding the audience not just the user and when it is the mass medium of TV the family audience matters. This is why it is an interesting topic for discussion when used in mass market media (rather than more directly targeted communication).

Without being overly conservative I sincerely hope that brands don’t continue to reach for stand-out notoriety by the use of the lowest creative common denominators in overtly describing what many real people consider to be discrete categories.

The true creative challenge is to communicate the problem and benefit / solution without the reliance on the literal descriptions and language.

I come from a Land Down Under – Telstra TV ad

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The ad, created by DDB Sydney, features Men At Work’s Colin Hay and a cast of Ozzies in London. An unbranded version of the ad was played to the whole Olympic team just after Australia’s flag bearer was announced. This immediately shows that it is hitting the right note with real people.

I like it for its honest simplicity and emotional effectiveness, versus other efforts to convince us of Ozzie roots / provenance or general “Ozzieness”. This spot seems to strike the right “C’mon Ozzie” chord with the locals versus metaphorical skyward gazing from Qantas or too much deep and meaningful from CommBank with Toni Collette.

A few people have referenced this ad in preference to the Qantas effort and I can understand why. Both use music to bring you the brand, but Telstra hit a better note with the locals.

And we might even assume that it is relevant as these Ozzies will all be phoning home!?

A good tune with the right emotional pull can make even a modest ad, with few rational reasons to believe, a memorable and magical effort. At the end of the day and as Hegarty once said:

“If you can’t say it, sing it…”

OXY – Zit popping man sized problems

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Please note – I wouldn’t look at this if you’ve got food on your mind! It contains explicit zit popping material.

A while ago an almost surgical excising of a zit became an internet viral hit – the on-line pimple squeezing got a lot of views. 5 million endured the 3 minutes in full glory.

Some of those unforgettable moments are in this piece from Naked Comms in Sydney together with a multitude of other zit popping moments.

The venerable Adam Ferrier said:

“We pride ourselves on finding the right solution to the presenting problem. This video, although difficult to watch for some, will tickle the target markets interest and get people to try Oxy.

“The idea came from the simple insight that guys like watching videos of guys squeezing big pimples. It speaks to our target much more authentically than the glossy, cheesy work of Oxy’s big spending competitors. We believe this work will result in mass trial of the brand, and change consumer behaviour towards Oxy.”

An age ago I worked on the brand when it was with SmithKlineBeecham. We thought ourselves somewhat revolutionary for introducing the word “zit” into our ads – famously coining the line “Blitz those Zits with Oxy”. It did well as it appealed to the target in their terms versus Clearasil which was still talking “cleansing”.

That was prior to the connected revolution the target enjoy today so I think it is probably a very smart strategy to re-calibrate the conversation (on-line at least) and show the true gory glory to the target.

The on-line piece concludes on a free sample afer the “man sized” message – it works and should generate trial if it reaches enough people. My only add-on would have been something a bit more brand centric about to close…something like:

“Blitz those Zits with Oxy…”

New Old Spice Olympics ad – “I will live forever”.

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I liked the last set of ads P&G released for the brand. They were in keeping with the “Smell like a Man” theme of previous work and had the same nicely edited touch.

But this work is a head scratcher?

The same tune is applied to what I think is quite a different idea and I’m left wondering if this is stretching the original creative premise too far just to shoe horn in the Olympics reference? It doesn’t really work as part of the previous idea or as a stand alone.

Particularly after P&G did such an original and classy job with Olympic mums?

Perhaps this is a case of “Too much of a good thing” regarding Smell Like A Man theming, and P&G need to find a more original way to build on their classic work if the brand is going to continue to re-establish itself.

New Qantas TV ad – “you’re the reason we fly”

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2007 to present

After much anticipation the new Qantas campaign has launched.

The ad features the new tagline “You’re the reason we fly” with a Daniel Johns track, titled “Atlas”. Somewhat put in the shade by the latest Telstra “Land Down Under” track. The ad also has a new logo, a compilation of 22,000 Australian faces which make up the flying kangaroo.

It’s interesting that the campaign has dropped the famous song “I still call Australia Home” and has also moved away from iconic Australian images.

Featuring real people is a “see-through” strategy to ensure that “real” people feel that this is their airline (and that’s the reason they fly…). It hopes to be relevant to them and that they will relate to it. As an iconic national carrier, that has arguably lost it’s way, this is quite a risk. The notional change from “Australia’s” to “Australian‘s” airline indicated that this was coming.

The question is what does the ad do to either inspire people afresh or change attitudes? And there is a bit of a negative mountain to climb in many travelers minds both perceived (press negativity) and experienced (the entertainment isn’t working, it’s late again etc)

Emotionally it engages through the everyday people it hopes to be relevant to. Some nice shots and as you would expect beautifully produced. The launch campaign is customer-focused, featuring Australian’s from the coast, the cities and the country, a destination-based TVC will follow.

Unfortunately the depiction of everyday people is somewhat generic. The “reasons to believe” or think differently about the carrier are absent.

I believe advertising must have a creative message that sells (really!). I’m not sure what I am asked to buy in this ad or what attitude I am expected to change? In other words it is generic.

The previous ad famously became an anthem for all that was great about Australia (and delivered by Qantas).

This seems to lack any proprietary backbone in terms of what is unique about Qantas. Owning the place was one thing that resonated as it is a national carrier going to all parts of the country (less true these days). Owning the people is quite a different proposition that relies on delivering superb service which judging from on-line comments is somewhat lacking of late.

In comparison to the Virgin ad which stressed a fast pace and determined approach to service (…showing staff, service and boasting a lot of planes no less!), this ad falls short on delivering a message that you can grab hold of and believe in. At this stage in the brand journey, people need a bit more substance to believe in.

The compilation logo treatment has a lot more style than substance and is perhaps too wrapped up in the strategy of “Australian’s” versus a clear depiction of the logo, particularly when there are no other clear brand references in the ad – I believe that you can never assume that everyone seeing it knows who it is for.

I completely get where the ad is trying to position the brand, I’m just not sure it is as convincing as it needs to be.

As a recent article put it the new generation of traveller has no emotional attachment to Qantas and its wider significance to the country, also suggesting that:

Qantas is coming home to an empty house, with a sign pinned to the fridge saying, “Your chicken dinner – or beef dinner if we cannot fulfil your first choice – is in the dog” and an ever-growing stack of bills to pay.

A lot of work to be done to change hearts and minds.

Qantas has said that the TVCs are designed to tug on the “heart strings” and to “re-engage emotionally with consumers”.

The final stage of the campaign, which Qantas has labelled the ‘prove’ segment, will make up the lions-share of the rebrand efforts.

Is this another example of the consumer being gently introduced into the sell via a soft emotionally charged entrée? It seems to be a trend amongst bigger budget brands to “engage” emotionally first then sell second with proof points (Commonwealth Bank, Virgin Mobile, Woolworth’s etc).

The cynical might suggest this could be a clever sales tactic by agencies. But I think it is flawed to assume that consumers are interested enough to stay with brands through these different phases (and connect them). The better option is surely to make a single ad (or connected campaign) which can receive significant weight and generate the desired impact emotionally AND rationally (Hyundai, Cannon, The Guardian etc)

The team at Qantas are skilled marketeers with broad budgets and I hope that the rational reasons to fly with them (the proof) will be delivered in the next ad against this emotionally staged backdrop of relating to everyday people.

The problem with this execution is a basic one – marketing 101 really:

“what is actually proprietary and unique about this ad”?

The answer is very little. Added to which, the ‘You’re The Reason We Fly‘ tagline is exactly the same wording used by the now-defunct Carnival Airlines in the USA.

As reported in AdNews, creative leaders have not suggested Qantas plagiarised the positioning, they have chastised the company for using a “generic” statement that could have been used before, and for “not doing their homework”.

McCann executive creative director John Mescall told AdNews: “It’s not surprising this has happened because it is such a generic motherhood statement. This is laziness not plagiarism.

A lazy, generic approach to advertising and the assumption that consumers will be interested enough in the emotional “art” to act or change opinions, shows a lack of insight into the consumer, the category and a lack of belief in the brand’s selling points (which are absent).

Ultimately everyday people will judge this work versus the previous iconic work and more importantly, they will judge the airline by the delivery of a decent service in a highly competitive market.

Unfortunately, I think that this work will fly by them relatively unnoticed.

Carefree Actifresh – The “Vagina” Word TV ad

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Much of my recent postings have been around the subject of “taste”.

This is taste in terms of what advertising should and shouldn’t say and suggest around traditionally taboo subjects. As well as examples of poor taste propped up by the excuse of irreverence and tongue in cheek (Lynx being a shocker)

Some would argue that taste is a subjective measure of what we as individuals deem appropriate as advertising.

I think that the question of taste or advertising standards is more than that. We need to arbitrate in these matters on behalf of the mass market majority who are exposed to the advertising – particularly when it is on TV. Rather than crushing creativity, this should actually prompt more ingenious, imaginative solutions to communication.

The creative community can argue that we should break these taboos – use the word vagina when discussing feminine hygiene. Show explicit imagery to demonstrate problems (accidents / disease etc). Many might suggest that we are lessening the creative impact by embargoing these words and images.

At the risk of sounding conservative on creativity, I don’t agree.

I think that this ad is a beautifully produced ad. It captures the attention and the dialogue is relevant and motivating to the target. The last thing it needed was the seemingly gratuitous inclusion of the word vagina. I don’t think this inclusion adds anything to comprehension or awareness of the message. It just shocks the casual viewer, as in “did they just say that”?

Are we to imagine that the target didn’t get the message and needed to be alerted to it through hearing vagina in the monologue?

In the words of Johnson & Johnson:

“We have decided to take a bold approach in this campaign with the aim to tackle a subject which has always been taboo.”

I don’t think the language is going to make this a bold ad on a taboo subject.

There is a lot of debate on it at present. Daye Moffitt, brand strategy director at creative agency Moon, offered a female perspective.

“Personally, it makes me cringe, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing and I do think it is a good strategy. The shock tactic helps with getting young women to listen up – it gets their attention in a very loud marketplace.  It’s an effective and memorable ad, certainly.”

With the greatest respect to Daye, I think that cringe is the issue – imagine how parents with teenage boys respond when they hear it.

As anticipated the Australian Advertising Standards Bureau has received over 30 complaints since the ad first screened on Sunday evening. A spokesperson for the ASB said:

 “Most of the complaints are about the terminology that’s used and the nakedness of the woman,”

Interesting that the nudity got so much attention, suggesting how conservative our viewers really are.

The creative challenge reaches beyond the use of explicit or provocative language. And “vagina” can be considered as explicit language to many in the mass market living rooms.

Creativity needs to find new ways of reaching into the consciousness of viewers. Ways that don’t rely on gimmicks, tricks and controversy.

The ad is good, not great, and the inclusion of the word vagina merely serves to draw attention to the word not the problem or brand. Probably at the cringing discomfort of many women who would rather not shout it loud and proud from the living room floor.

These women are after all the target market and discretion in communication is perhaps more relevant and motivating than the vagina monologue.

Status Quo Coles TV ad – Prices are Down, Down, they’re staying down!

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Coles Supermarkets logo.

Every bit of me says I should lambast this work.

Here we have the legends (Grandfathers…) of Rock, the mighty Status Quo, reworking their 1975 hit, ‘Down, deeper and down’, to include Coles’ ‘Down, down, prices are down’.

Quo’s original track was the inspiration behind the supermarket’s grating, but memorable tune introduced last year.

But before I drift off into dismissive hyperbole about the demise of the once great ad industry, a few salient thoughts:

  1. There is a lot of tongue in cheek in this one.
  2. Quo were the inspiration for the tune anyway.
  3. The band seem to be having fun – no doubt acutely aware of the ease of making money from Coles.

The overall impression isn’t therefore that this is a credible Rock band selling out, it’s more a case of here are some ageing Rockers having a laugh at the expense of Coles.

At the same time it delivers the message and as a nod to the original tune is a bit of fun (if a bit of a cringe at the same time). This should appeal to a lot of the mass market and get the tune lazer etched into everyone’s subconscious.

Red guitars on sale in-store apparently.

Funny for a moment, but I only hope we don’t have to endure the joke too often on our screens!

Here are the boys doing their bit:

Kleenex Gripples toilet roll TV ad – dog sniffs bums

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We now firmly understand that a labrador puppy is the spokes-dog for toilet paper.

Usually he sprukes soft, strong and very, very long. And because he is soft and cuddly, we naturally assume that the product has similar qualities. We don’t often question if these are the properties that make it the best toilet paper, probably because it’s not something we choose to debate and discuss.

So it’s interesting to see Kleenex apply this more direct approach to the category.

Basically, does your bum smell?

After the initial shock of being confronted by such a direct accusation, we can consider what the ad is trying to do.

The cute puppy, is now less interested in playing with toilet rolls and is more interested in being a dog and smelling bums. Those that use Kleenex pass the test. Those that don’t get a yelp of terror from our cute character assassin.

Kleenex have made one concession to our potential embarrassment by making up a new word for textured toilet paper – gripples. To me it sounds a bit like a grade of sandpaper and perhaps not as cumfy as it is meant to. They are trading off this imaginative invention:

Here is what the company says in a press release from Kimberly-Clark:

“While a little edgier than previous Kleenex Cottonelle brand campaigns, the aim is to attract more premium brand switchers, who represent 60% of the market, by communicating the strength of Kleenex Cottonelle as well as the softness it’s renowned for.”

Marketing manager for Kleenex Cottonelle brand, Michelle Rossier said:

‘People use personal care products to feel clean and fresh all day, however they don’t connect this feeling to the toilet tissue they buy. The new campaign positions Kleenex Cottonelle brand as the toilet tissue that provides you with a superior level of clean.”

On the one hand (pun intended) this is a very different move in the category. It will get noticed.

On the other, do people want to be confronted by such a direct message?

My view is that it works to build awareness, but NOT brand engagement amongst the mass market. It has the cute credentials of the puppy to defuse a very direct commentary on hygiene and might perhaps, through the innovative invention of gripples, combine enough rational reasons with the emotion of our previously polite puppy to put this brand at the top of the shopping list. But that is a big “might” in the mass market shopping aisle.

Whilst it is great to see some difference in one of those tricky categories, I think this is missing the true insight on real consumer attitudes and the client has been sold “difference” against “effectiveness”.

The association to a dog sniffing a bum (and what we mean here is poo!) is at odds with what consumers want from the category – i.e. discretion and effectiveness without the overt reference to usage. No one wants to badge themselves in this category!

Just like the Care Free “Vagina” ad, the literal use of contentious words and actions becomes gratuitous and actually isn’t big or clever from a creative point of view. Very few brands successfully shock us into the sell – despite a creative belief that the notoriety of contentious / confronting ads will increase appeal.

As a footnote, I understand that there has been an immediate sales impact on Kleenex. And not a good one. Bummer.

 

Berocca 50+ “Performance yes, Miracles no” TV ad

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Seeing this again still makes me grin and reminds me of why The Campaign Palace was such an innovative agency.

A tongue in cheek dig at the greying market and with a tone of voice and execution that makes it memorable.

Relevant, interesting and perhaps more motivating than the usual dreary in-kitchen vitamin taking to look after the Grand-kids sort of approach.

Great work from the now closing Campaign Palace. Palace chief creative officer Reed Collins:

“In the all too dreary world of pharmaceutical advertising Berocca really stands out. The new Berocca Focus 50+ campaign is refreshingly honest for the category and it’s audience.”

CCO: Reed Collins
ACD: Gerhard Myburgh
AD: Andrew Jones
CW: Hywel James, Paul Bootlis
Producer: Jacqui Gillies
Production Co: Film Construction
Director: Steve Saussey
Producer: Sascha Hodgson
Editor: Gabi Muir
Group Account director: Bruce Davidson
National Marketing Manager: George Reeves
Senior Brand Manager: Nick Lynch
Brand Manager: Kylie Berge

LEGO Build with Google, LEGO Movies, LEGO Spaceman and LEGO VW Combi Camper

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Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...

LEGO logo

LEGO is a brand that has successfully re-invented itself.

Licensing innovation and an ability to evolve has been a major part of the strategy. LEGO has realised that it’s functionality and core proposition of creativity expressed as “Just imagine…” can be applied to an abundance of diverse brands and even services.

Some great examples include:

LEGO Technic, originally launched in 1977 and relaunched in the modern format in 1984, made efforts from brands like Frank Hornby’s  Meccano redundant to modern kids.

Star Wars LEGO with cheeky characters and amazingly accurate models, relaunching the brand to a generation of new consumers (and collectors).

A LEGO pilot even took to the upper atmosphere courtesy of some enterprising Canadian students:

And I spent a very enjoyable couple of days, unashamedly reliving my childhood by building a LEGO VW 1962 Combi Camper, using all 1,322 pieces of the stuff.

A few sore fingers later and it has pride of place on the mantlepiece and well out of reach of the kids…

Needless to say every great brand is in the sights of a Hollywood producer.

The “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” team of Phil Lord and Christopher Miller is directing “LEGO: The Piece of Resistance” which is a hybrid of live-action and LEGO-based animation. It follows the adventures of “instruction worker” Emmet (voiced by Chris Pratt), a manual labourer in the LEGO world, capable only of following directions from a manual. Will Arnett will voice the role of LEGO Batman. LEGO Yoda, Indiana Jones and Superman will also feature in this battle of good versus evil.

Australian visual-effects house Animal Logic will handle the CGI, which is expected to comprise 80 percent of “LEGO.” The project is scheduled for US release on Feb. 28, 2014.

So despite its plastic rigidity, LEGO has certainly become an incredibly flexible brand without losing it’s core promise of creativity and imagination – as brilliantly established in its classic 1981 Mike Cozens “Kipper” ad, still one of the best ads ever made (interestingly the impressionist Roger Kitter not Tommy Cooper does the voiceover):

If movie licensing and production weren’t enough, this latest collaboration with Google proves LEGO is a brand still innovating in exciting and very relevant new areas.

LEGO and Google have linked up in a new project, called Build, via M&C Saatchi’s digital agency Mark, to showcase the 3D capabilities of Google’s web browser Chrome. The project was produced by Swedish digital agency North Kingdom. It also marks the 50th anniversary of Lego’s launch in Australia.

The campaign allows users to claim their own plots anywhere in Australia and New Zealand, with plans to roll it out globally. Builders can use up to 1,000 virtual bricks to construct buildings and can then share their creations online and with their friends.

To show just how far LEGO has come, Lucinda Barlow, head of marketing for Google Australia and New Zealand said in a press release:

“If a toy could be part of a company’s DNA then Lego would be part of Google’s. We’ve loved working together to create Build, which turns the web into a collaborative canvas where you can create and explore a new Lego world together, online.”

All this from a brick first invented in Billund, Denmark in 1949.

Once in Build, it feels a bit like the early virtual world / second life experience, but you are excused any criticism of reality and pixilation because it’s LEGO.

Also fascinating to see the bizarre buildings already built in my street. Who knew that I had such interesting neighbours!

This latest Google collaboration continues to perpetuate the core brand proposition across another new sector and user group, helping to secure LEGO’s  future for another 50 years amongst kids of all ages.

Have a go, but watch out it is incredibly addictive…BUILD

Woolworths Supervisor Jillian Arnold and Truckie Harold Haigh

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Having seen the launch campaign, many anticipated a more functional follow-up to the campaign in these individual character spots.

How many trucks does it take to get it there fresh?

How quickly do onions get from the soil to the store?

In fact the curious potato farmer delivers some of this in terms of a truth about how the potatoes are cleaned.

The aim is to provide detailed backstories with the aim of personalising the quality and quantity of Australian produce and local sustainability promoted by Woolworths.

The issue is how many potential shoppers feel that an engaging character alone can convince them of the Fresh Food People claim? Particularly in the absence of any product info. about quality?

They are beautifully produced, but do they change hearts and minds when it comes to the store and the claim “Fresh Food People”? I’m not so sure.

P&G “Mom” Olympics TV ad

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Here is a US ad that has over 4 million views on YouTube.

Many will have participated in the website by sending “Mom” a message of thanks at: http://www.facebook.com/thankyoumom

It was mentioned by BBH’s John Hegarty at Cannes this year in his light-hearted session with Dan Wieden.

Being a fan of BBH, I keep an eye on his comments from Cannes and particularly liked his blunt assessment of much of the work he sees.

This P&G ad is treading familiar, but tricky emotive ground. The old “mom got me here through her dedication to supporting my sport” and presumably cleaning the kit with P&G product. It has been done before in relation to cleaning products, but this certainly isn’t about getting the grime out of the muddy shorts and sweatshirt sort of stuff.

Getting the emotional tone right in an ad is a very hard thing to do.

There was a brilliant P&G Pampers ad that got it right for parents.

On this P&G Olympics ad Hegarty said in conversation with Dan:

“If I had been passed that script and read it I might have vomited. The vomit factor was high if you got it wrong, but you really made it work.
“You have to make sure that the emotions are relevant. It really could have backfired on this.”

Yet again John reverts to the basic principle of relevance to prove the point.

The relevance of this ad to the journey, people and products is there and it is a truly inspiring ad for that reason. Consumers are savvy enough to recognise P&G’s involvement in this journey without seeing too many tubs and tumble dryers.

When I was lucky enough to work at BBH, John said that all advertising strategy needed to be “relevant, interesting and motivating”. I’ve stuck by this and found it to be the best test of a creative idea.

Clearly Hegarty still believes in the basics.

The best ad from Cannes – Guardian open journalism: “Three Little Pigs” TV ad – the Guardian

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Logo of the British newspaper The Guardian

The Guardian newspaper in the UK has a long history of great advertising.

The classic Points of View TV ad is one of the best.

This ad (even at 2 minutes) is my choice from Cannes, although it didn’t bring home the bacon in terms of awards…

It communicates a complicated message of the breadth of Guardian coverage through a brilliantly constructed creative examination of a story we all know. Entertaining, interesting, relevant and motivating by underpinning the credentials of a great paper that is still innovating in the digital world.

A very different perspective and very much what the Guardian brand stands for.

McCann Melbourne creative director Annie Price.

Price has urged Aussie marketers and agencies against treating people like “idiots”, and has held up the highly regarded ‘The Little Pigs’ campaign by BBH as an example of the type of advertising the local industry should be striving for.

She told AdNews: “There’s not much Australian advertising can’t learn from this stunning commercial.

“It’s intelligent. It’s entertaining. It’s beautifully produced and so gripping, it has you coming back for more and more. It really is storytelling at its finest. There’s no doubt who it’s for and you’re left feeling compelled to go and buy a paper.

“It’s the intelligence of the Guardian commercial that most impressed me.

“No denying we make some great ads in Oz.

“But sadly, Australian TV screens are still full of a disproportional amount of commercials that treat people like idiots. Ads that assume that we are sitting there on the edge of our seats, just waiting to be informed about toilet cleaner, muesli bars or moisturiser by a moronic presenter. It’s 1950s advertising without the lovely retro outfits and atomic burst laminate.

“Clients and agencies alike would do well to remember that consumers are getting their information from so many sources nowadays, TV is not king. For us to truly impact on someone’s life via TV, and make a real connection, we’d better be smart about it and we’d better not insult his or her intelligence.”

Hahn Cannes Gold Winner – Super Goes in Super Dry comes out

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Hahn by Publicis Mojo wins, but by the skin of it’s teeth as it wasn’t originally shortlisted and got in via a wild-card vote (another peculiar aspect to Cannes voting).

In such a tough category, an interesting choice. Maybe it’s the Night Rider music as much as the action that makes it memorable? It certainly stands out from the beer crowd and has been recognised for the fact.

James Magnussen and CommBank Can / Can’t, versus NAB honesty advertising

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Just when I thought that this campaign was on-track to deliver justification of the Toni Collette “Can” campaign via press and outdoor, this ad pops up?

Perhaps the budgets of the bank are indeed bottomless.

I get that they sponsor James Magnussen (whatever benefit this brings…), but what is the relevance to banking here or the campaign?

Entertaining perhaps, different certainly, but we were promised that banking would be different with CommBank who “can” deliver for us? This is delivering a swimmer to the Olympics via some larrikin letters?

Surely banking is governed by the same KPI’s as the rest of the marketing world – sales and service levels of satisfaction. Perhaps awareness of this sponsorship was the objective, somewhat confused by “Can” versus the letter “T” (very Sesame Street)

I fail to fully understand where this Can campaign strategy is going. Toni Collette, to rational press and outdoor, to gimmicky support of sponsorship…I’m struggling to see the wood for the trees. I wonder if potential customers are as confused? Banking is serious business and CommBank seem to be taking a very light approach to attract customers purely on emotive values.

If loyalty is a function of trust, I think that the new NAB campaign is doing a better job. Staged stunts perhaps, but I think the mass market majority will come away with the feeling of trust and security that a bank wants to impart. I particularly like the “spelt my name wrong” comment – adding some much needed authenticity after the slightly over done walkie-talkie dialogue:

Oh to have a bank’s budgets…

Hyundai New Generation i30 “Free Yourself” – “I want to break free” with Queen TV ad

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Here’s something that doesn’t demand too much thought.

Hyundai are pitching freedom.

Maybe not that unique when it comes to cars, but nice to see a more creative execution rather than the happy family / cafe couple that we usually get bored by.

Innocean creative director Scott Lambert  said that the ad represented a departure from Hyundai’s traditionally “sophisticated, clean style of commercial for a more emotive feel”, with more colour and tone than the brand usually employs.

The rights to the music cost “around $200,000″ – so we might be seeing more of this…and at least at that cost the music is central to the creative idea. The supercut editing is nicely done and you get a look at the car and features – the sun-roof, radio etc. All done in a way that entertains and communicates.

A bit more real and a lot more noticeable.

Woolworths Fresh Food People new ad – “Welcome to Australia’s Fresh Food People”.

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After much anticipation (in ad circles at least) Woolworths aired the new campaign from Droga in last nights high rating spots. Here is the corporate line:

“Today we embark on a new journey for our company. We have a proud history at Woolworths of bringing Australians outstanding fresh food and value. We are building on this and our new campaign marks the start of a new promise to our customers as ‘Australia’s Fresh Food People’.
“A new ad campaign, which commences tonight, features nine real Woolworths Fresh Food people. Our renewed focus on our people is testament to the faith we have that Woolworths’ people are our greatest asset.

“Coupled with that is our new theme song, which highlights the rhythm of the seasons and celebrates that every day, every week, every month of the year, Woolies people open the doors to our stores and bake the freshest bread, serve the freshest fruit and veg and the best quality Australian meat and seafood.

Interestingly the music, written by Frankie Carle‘s “Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, I Love You” has been used previously by Walmart. The track was re-recorded by Gossling (Helen Croome) in keeping with the original recording by Kitty Kallen with Lawrence Welk & His Champagne Orchestra and made famous by Betty Driver

In a nice twist, Woolworth’s have given you the chance to download for free on their website

The ad is about Woolies people and continues to push the “Fresh Food” promise via these people. I really like the simple, but effective introduction of the word “Australia’s”. Home grown provenance is a big motivator (…if at the right price!)

Many analysts were expecting a bigger leap forward from the new agency, but this is a mega-brand making it’s move and nothing is done without careful consideration. The tone of these ads brings a freshness that has been lacking and does differentiate from Coles celeb advocacy approach.

People are important, but product and prices are dominating the supermarket wars at present, which Coles are perceived as winning through delivery of this message with strong personalities in the Curtis and Dawn ad that resonates well with the viewer.

This ad delivers “year round” love of Woolies by Woolies fresh food people. It demonstrates what we assume are real employees and suppliers who love Woolies. But why should we love Woolies?

It is an expensive looking and beautifully produced piece of work. Watchability is right up there and I actually believe that these people are who they claim to be, which is important in advocate advertising. But is it effective advertising in building loyalty?

The question as to why consumers would love Woolies remains. Seeing people at work in farms, fields and stores might not be enough to give people reasons why Woolies is really the “freshest” in the cut throat world of battling Coles.

Fresh Food People needs qualification since Coles came into the argument. The ad is relevant, certainly interesting, but the motivation for a consumer to believe the Fresh Food promise and why this if different to Coles is the key deliverable.

Assuming people will click into the website for more answers is a big assumption – on-line is the domain of range and pricing (as shown in the great Woolies app). Without this step, there is no qualification to the promise?

Here is an example of what people see when they click – Malcolm the farmer talking about running and potatoes. There is actually some motivating news in there, but should this be the main ad (apparently 12 ads will run so it might well be)? :

Hopefully the campaign develops with rational product and price proof points, still delivered in this strong emotive style to entice the shoppers – perhaps less sexy advertising, but potentially more motivating in today’s climate.

A couple of other interesting points to note are the subtle re-brand (Woolworths moves from red to green). And as reported in Mumbrella, Woolworths will remove walls to behind-the-scenes areas of its stores so that customers will be able to see bakers and butchers in action. The brand will also refit stores with better lighting and address checkout queues. (My local Woolies did this 3 weeks ago by moving the stacked special offers from in front of the tills –  and it is still talked about in hushed tones down the aisles…!)

Great advertising engages and entertains, but ultimately needs to sell to us by delivering reasons to believe in the brand promise and motivate us to buy and remain loyal.

Hopefully this campaign will deliver the rational reasons, as well as the feel-good fresh food people.

K-Swiss Kenny Powers MFCEO – Vimeo winner

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This won an award for advertising in the recent Vimeo awards which brought it to broader attention after it’s launch last year.

It’s not often that you see a brand take such a left turn in it’s promotional thinking

K-Swiss the American footwear brand, has won recognition for the Kenny Powers campaign spun off the fictional character’s appearance in the HBO series Eastbound and Down.

The MFCEO campaign won K-Swiss Client of the Year at the One Show Awards, along with three Gold Pencils for Non-Broadcast/Online, Branded Content/Online Integrated Branding/Consumer Campaign as well as Vimeo recognition.

Danny McBride appears as Kenny Powers, the CEO in an online campaign. The campaign included billboards in Times Square and Venice Beach, a campaign micro-site, New York City subway posters and a 1-888 number where callers could call and hear an inspirational message from Powers.

One of the more interesting and risky brand initiatives that has propelled K-Swiss upwards in the “cool” charts…and very unusual for American advertising.

The Blades launch is quite something (there might be some strong language in this one…!).

It’s an interesting question – what is acceptable in advertising? This keeps winning awards and the ex Adidas marketing chief who commissioned it is supplying sales figures to say it works. Humour is often subjective, but this was a proven character from HBO’s Eastbound and Down and using Kenny was less of a risk than it might appear.

It certainly forces a reappraisal of the brand and this association will stick for a while, not that the company is moving away from it, more ads are in production with Kenny.

One things for sure, these ads make a statement – irreverent and without apology, differentiating the product from everything else on the shelf (and in the store!). That’s why I like it. Bold and brave, but hopefully not foolhardy – time will tell.

K-Swiss are committed and are on a roll.

Symmetry – Vimeo Grand Prix Winner by Everynone

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A truly original piece of work that won an award.

It provokes some emotion and thought, ending on an interesting juxtaposition…

Bonds Baby’s “Zip It” with Devo’s “Whip It”

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I like the Bonds work. It is in the main simple and is based on a great product demo (even the underwear). It sells you the stuff in an informative, unique and entertaining way.

I particularly liked previous efforts such as Rollerskating. Good clean fun and famous for it.

This is nice, but as they have hit the nail on the head with a great track – Whip it by Devo, they might have been a bit more inventive in the execution – a few more naughty babies perhaps? I’ve got one if they were struggling…

Lynx “Clean your balls” with Sophie Monk.

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I used to think that Lynx prided themselves in clever advertising.

Lynx have built a brand around the promise to pre-pubescent boys that using Lynx makes you irresistible to the opposite sex.

This has been done with wit, irreverence and a clever tongue in cheek sense of humour to the most part.

This latest work featuring Sophie Monk (a red flag in itself) was directly, scene for scene, copied from an existing AXE ad in the US? Surely just looking at the US effort would force you to question the merits of this campaign, not encourage you to repeat the mistake?

The online ad exploits the hilarious double entendre of the phrase ‘clean your balls’ as Sophie Monk demonstrates the grime-removal strength of Lynx gel on “hairy balls” (tennis balls), “saggy balls” (deflated medicine balls) and an African American man’s “big ball sack” (a netted bag of soccer balls).

3 minutes of the same puerile joke.

No sitting on the fence, no excuses, it is an absolute shocker.

It was done in conjunction with ZOO magazine and is described as

“provocative, tongue-fully-planted-in-cheek campaign”.

Really?

I think they got it very wrong.

Even more amazing when you also consider that the ‘Clean your balls’ campaign follows Lynx’s controversial ‘Rules of rugby’ campaign which was removed at the behest of the Advertising Standards Bureau last year after complaints that it objectified women.

Collective Shout, a lobby group that campaigns against the sexualisation of advertising, has put in a complaint to the Advertising Standards Bureau.

Tankard Reist, co-founder of Collective Shout said that:

“objectifying women” in these “hyper-sexualised scenes” is actually harmful, adding: “They contribute to an ongoing second-class status of women.”

There is a big difference between “sexy advertising” or irreverent tongue in cheek humour and bad taste and there is no excuse for suggesting that this is what the target responds to. A few people have used this generalisation in support of the work. It actually suggests a level of disregard for the target’s ability to comprehend a clever piece of advertising and justifies cheap work that throws the industry back 10 years.

Previous Lynx work (ref Angels or Anarchy House or Snow Angles ) is far superior to this effort, generating a much more aspirational and positive brand image and Unilever should prepare themselves for a trade (if not consumer) backlash.

As Mumbrella said:

One hundred and eighty seconds around one double innuendo. Somebody had to come home from work knowing that they made this”. 

Dee Madigan, the respected creative director of Madigan Communications and a panellist on ABC1’s The Gruen Transfer, said the Lynx ”cleans your balls” advertisement was suited to its target audience.

”Young males like to go against the grain,” she said. ”Doing something sexist and offensive, that’s kind of the strategy.”

I couldn’t disagree more. This is confusing irreverence with irrevocable bad taste and poor advertising, defended by a lack of insight on the target. Industry figures should strive for a smarter, aspirational solution otherwise the industry will continue to be derided by on-lookers.

Not what the brand or industry needs and surely Sophie Monk isn’t that desperate to get work?

And as a postscript, the advert has (finally!) been censured after a slew of complaints to the ad watchdog.

Bizarrely, the Advertising Standards Board (ASB) decided that the ad was not derogatory to women, but said

“with the exception of the depiction of the older man, the depictions were not offensive or demeaning to any person or section of society”.

Not so sure myself!

The Board noted the concerns that the advertisement is offensive and discriminates against elderly men in particular as it refers to their “old saggy balls not being played with for years”.

The Board considered that the older man is depicted in a negative manner with the inference in the advertisement being that the older man does not receive any attention due to his age. The Board considered that this is a negative depiction of an older person and that this depiction does amount to discrimination against older men.”

In response to the findings Unilever said:

“The men who appear in the commercial are representative of a wide range of age groups, from young to old, and all of them are portrayed in a humorous and good-natured way. It was never the intention of the commercial to discriminate against  elderly people”

The elderly man is an object of ridicule. Unilever should not try to defend the indefensible.

A classic case of misinterpreting “irreverence” and “tongue in cheek” and stereotyping men and women – not clever work at all.

But if Unilever are repentant it is interesting to see them respond to the censure of the ‘clean your balls’ ad with a new online video featuring a mock press conference loaded with more dirty ball references

This is a desperate brand attempt to be funny and a further replication of the US mistake. For such an occasionally great brand it is a massive error of judgement.
And not funny. Perhaps the ASB will agree.

UK Cancer Council “the answer is plain” anti-smoking plain packaging ad

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The logo-free, drab dark brown plain cigarette...

So often we are told “what to do and what not to do”.

Seldom are we convinced of what we as individuals or society “should” be doing and why.

Government bodies have lost the art of advertising in favour of preaching or scare tactics.

This UK Cancer Council ad has a beautiful mix of advertising art and science. It intrigues you enough to interest you, hold your attention and then delivers a concluding message that is both powerful and absolutely believable. No drama, just the truth presented in a motivating manner.

It is completely relevant to the argument about plain packaging and will do more to motivate change than any number of government polls and opinions.

A great example of advertising resolving a complex argument with a simple and effective execution.

Etihad “Why” campaign

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I like a mix of rational and emotional values in advertising.

I’m often looking for the rational message – the sell, presented in an entertaining and engaging way. This for me is the essence of good advertising.

Here’s a new spot for Etihad that offers you the promise that Etihad are better and invites you into some website answers. The site gives you some super facts and figures to support the reason why so many people switch to Etihad.

Things like:

  • 6,999,603 – the number of rewards redeemed by members of Etihad Guest, one of the world’s most flexible and generous loyalty programmes etc

But you need to click to find it. http://www.whyetihad.com/global/en/ once clicked this is a convincing site and could increase consideration of Etihad.

But it is very rational, a lot of facts and figures, very static and with no pictures of people on planes (…a bit obvious, but the best demonstration of in-flight service). Virgin Australia did a nice job of cramming in the facts to a very entertaining ad with premium appeal and pace.

The experience of flying is becoming commonplace, but people still need to feel it is an experience that they can enjoy rather than endure. It is still a service based industry.

How much more motivating if we were shown specifics of service in the Etihad spot? Or better still, if so many people have switched to Etihad, this is inviting advocacy statements from customers – one of the most powerful sales tools as seen with Emirates. My mum now swears by Emirates…economy not first class (…when is too much really too much!?)

Also no mention of sports on the website? By their own admission, Etihad is “mad about sports. We sponsor Manchester City Football Club, Harlequins Rugby Team, the Scuderia Ferrari F1 team, the GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship and the Abu Dhabi Golf Championships.” 

As a part of their strategy this is a big plus to the large percentage of people who also love sports and worth mentioning (particularly at Man City and F1 prices…)

But back to the “click” strategy – in an age of immediacy, it needs to be a big promise (usually prizes) or intriguing question to get people to click and justify claims in an ad or to find out more about the product or service.

The proposition for the airlines is multi-faceted. Particularly profitable premium routes where it needs to combine price and service to give great value. Traveling 14 hours means you need some comfort, entertainment and service as well as an affordable ticket and the security of knowing it is a major carrier with all the safety and efficiency you expect.

A lot of these answers are there (even if the in-flight experience isn’t best explained), but I think if you are making a big statement such as “people prefer us”, it makes the statement more effective to qualify it there and then in the ad. This ad could have had multiple variants which answered the “why” with a few of the reasons.

One argument for the “click and go” strategy could be the global usage and language variants, but advertising works pretty much the same way in any language. Asking consumers to click into a website to justify the claim is tough.

The casting (particulalry the sun bathing couple?) and CGI in the ad implied a tight budget and unfortunately it shows in the finished product. This is relevant when airlines have traditionally put all the bells and whistles into the ad, even Garuda has a touch of glamour.

The hidden gem in the website was the economy claim. Whilst premium expectations are all about service pre, during and post flight, an economy trip is nicely summarised by this which perfectly demonstrates the improved service and has a nice impact:

  • “Coffee or tea? That is the routine choice for most economy class guests. In Etihad Coral Economy Class things are rather different. A frothy cappuccino? Freshly brewed tea? Or perhaps a relaxing hot chocolate? The choice is as wide as our wide-body jets.”
Sometimes it’s the little things that really count and I wish they did the Sydney to Melbourne route!

CommBank “Can” Campaign – Kaching, Concierge, Sandcastle and Lollipop ladies

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Commbank has succeeded in getting a lot of attention through a teaser “can” campaign and launch ad with Toni Collette as posted below: Can

We now see the follow-up.

I was anticipating a bit more of a hard sell on product and service based attributes?

The “kaching” app is nice (any fees?). But the beleaguered commuter and lollipop ladies aren’t really selling me much of a service and I think a more motivating proposition is to give the potential customer real, rational reasons to switch banking based on leadership.

I still think the campaign needs to convince consumers why Commbank “can do something” no one else can or how Commbank will do something better than the others?

Hugs and feel goods don’t have the relevance, interest and motivation to get me through the door. Bank rates, service delivery and unique products other than apps could…

Here’s the series as launched:

Nice ads and well executed, but is a nice bank, with feel good friendly representatives enough to convince consumers to act in testing times?

The press which appeared after this post, does the best job so far of putting the rational support behind “can” (Can Press Campaign)

Interesting to see Mumbrella report some consumer feedback…

Nike Football, “My time is Now”

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14 million views on YouTube and still going strong.

I’ve often eulogized the Nike work. Their access to and use of stars is often exemplary, but does this one go too far?

It is a promo that invites you into an interactive on-line opportunity to “find out what it takes”.

All very slick as you would expect, but is it too much?

With a wealth of talent at their disposal, everyone is in this spot Neymar, M’Vila, Götze, Ribéry, Sneijder, Ronaldo to name a few. Even Lebron James is crammed in there!

A case of not seeing the wood for the trees and not getting the best value out of priceless talent?

Obviously Nike and football have moved onto the global stage, but I still prefer some of the more tailored work – any excuse to show Park Life again:

Carlsberg Euro 2012 Fan Academy TV ad. Probably the best football ad this year?

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You probably need to be English to get the most out of this. Which in itself is a great compliment to the spot – it nails the England fan mentality.

There are also very good choices in casting: headed by Des Lynam featuring England legends Bobby Charlton, Peter Shilton, Stuart Pearce and Ian Wright; actor Brian Blessed; ex-Olympic gold medallist Linford Christie; explorer Ray Mears; and TV presenter Helen Chamberlain serving pies.

But at the end of the day, stirring that in-built passion for the great game is going to bring rewards.

You might even feel that Carlsberg are in this one with you…before you realize that it is Danish brewing company founded in 1847 by J. C. Jacobsen after the name of his son Carl. Not very English really.

Interesting to see Carlsberg getting it right for the market and continuing a strong campaign of understanding who they are talking to. The watchability is great (to the England fan at least!)

ITV’s Euro 2012 trailer “It’s good to dream” – best football ad this year.

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As the Europe and football fans everywhere look towards another Euro 2012, there is a flurry of advertising activity from the likes of adidas, Carlsberg etc.

But of all the choices, I think that the ITV effort gets top marks.

For a TV promo. it is pretty good. And if we were talking about an agency, we might even say there’s a good insight on the beleaguered English fan thinking (dreaming) of what might have been.

Above all it is entertaining and gives you a positive feeling about ITV and perhaps a stronger inclination to watch the channel where you have a choice.

Some great little insights that show what might have been. I particularly like the Gazza (Paul Gascoigne) monument in place of the “Angel of the North” and the Kevin Keegan references (bias of a Newcastle United fan) and if only Maradonna had been sent off!

Pepsi MAX & Kyrie Irving Present: “Uncle Drew”

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I believe in the “truth” in advertising – that is the fact that creative scenarios are relevant, interesting and believable to the people who they are targeting.

This is critical in talent use. A previous post on Beckham and Beethoven shows that “making it up” doesn’t cut it. The joke or demonstration of skill needs to be genuine.

Pepsi have developed this film with Australian-American basketball player and 2012 NBA Rookie Of The Year, Kyrie Irving, in disguise as a fictional character named “Uncle Drew”.

It plays out in a really believable manner – you see the surprise and delight is genuine in the crowd. As it develops it becomes truly entertaining as Uncle Drew turns it on.

The branding is light. A couple of pack shots and credits.

But because of the high level of engagement, it works. This is creative content that is clever and attributes a lot of brand value to the guys who thought it up.

3 million plus views and the associated talk-ability prove that the effort is worth it.

Great talent is also important – the film was written and directed by Irving.

David Beckham kicks Beethoven’s Ode To Joy for Samsung Galaxy Note

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Samsung’s Olympic Games Ambassador David Beckham displays precise footwork with a 15-foot wall of drums, the GALAXY Note and the illustrative capabilities enabled by the S Pen.”

True, but as we saw when Beckham kicked it for Pepsi, there is increasing cynicism around these “skill” based creative ideas. (He didn’t really kick the shot that featured in the ad)

The product demo is great – big screen and a pen with an instant publish feature (my words not theirs!). It also looks good.

But we are all thinking that Becks probably popped in and did a couple of shots and the rest was done in post.

The thing that really gets the viral charts racing is when there is some genuine and believable skill. I can’t help thinking that this would have been more effective if we believed Becks had given it a go?

Reference Federer in his tennis shot for Gillette Fusion which knocks the bottle from the guys head – a bit more “believable”!

Stonemen “striptease” afternoon delight underwear ad

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Some controversy is bubbling up in marketing circles.

Recently there has been much discussion at how safe (vs shocking) advertising has become. If shock tactics work, how far can you go (ref the latest Amnesty International work)? Are shock tactics (sex, violence or otherwise) the lowest common denominator and lacking any true creativity?

This is where the advertising standards bureau plays a role. The problem is that the rise of the viral marketing campaign and the lack of a traditional TV ad leaves them in limbo and potentially powerless to act.

One thing is for certain, this campaign is creating brand fame for an otherwise unknown underwear brand called Stonemen.

As reported in B&T magazine, the ad asks the user to take a webcam headshot of themselves which is then overlayed on the face of a Stonemen underwear model in the featured magazine, with the user thereby becoming the object of the woman’s sexual fantasy.

Media personality and founder of women’s advocacy group Collective Shout, Melinda Tankard Reist, today told B&T she thought the campaign was backward and delusional.

Offensive or not, it is getting the attention and notoriety it intended.

This teaser when watched on Youtube leads you to the website where you can personalize the picture. The only distribution is via your own social media choices. View it here: http://afternoondelight.stonemen.com/

Some see this as the “diffusing and amusing” humorous element to the campaign. The problem as we all know is that the average high volume user of social media is under 18 and there is no barrier to them accessing, personalizing (in what ever fashion they chose) and distributing this?

The brand director has said:
“The high production values of the film reflect Stonemen’s own obsession with quality. To print a seamless 360 degrees image on a pair of undies has been a labour of love for us and we wanted to bring the same level of craft to the film. It’s rare that virals have this aesthetic and adding an interactive element is a genuine marriage between beauty and the kind of fun you like to have with your mates.”

The debate rages on and of real interest is how we moderate the ever increasing digital distribution of advertising messages, as well as what we deem acceptable in personal social media distribution, particularly when the age of the average user is most likely to be under 18 and it is facilitated by brands with campaigns like this.

A stark contrast to the ad posted here earlier this month. Conflicting strategic thinking, creative execution and impact:

Arnott’s Tim Tam ‘Truly, Madly Tim Tam’ orchard

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Tim Tams are as Australian as it gets.

Arnott’s did a nice piece of experiential work in Sydney based on the thought that “I wish Tim Tams grew on trees” as we all do!

The campaign was created and developed by DDB Sydney and its PR/experiential arm Mango Communications. The ad features real people and as I truly believe, the real reactions far outshine those of actors. You believe the delight and surprise of the happy punters.

Lots of clever social media integration, but at the end of the day people really do like free stuff. Particularly chocolate.

(still waiting for my free cadbury bars…)

Nissan Leaf – a world without petrol bowsers

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A very nicely executed idea that could grow into an ad.

It certainly demonstrates the core “USP” of the car i.e. it’s electric.

I’m also assuming that people who buy electric cars (and have the cash to pay the premium) are attracted by this.

Certainly grabbed some attention of quite a few school kids by the look of it. Kids are apparently strong influencers of the family car purchase so might not be a bad thing if Nissan are cool with the kids.

Created by Whybin\TBWA Group Melbourne and supported by it’s own Youtube channel

Pedigree “rescue unrescued” cinema ad – adoption drive

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This stirring (and long) cinema ad by Colenso BBDO New Zealand, invites cinema goers to make a choice in coloured 3D glasses. Accordingly they see a film based on whether they donate.

It’s a nice spot. Bit long in narrative and the idea is creatively intriguing holding your attention in the story.

But, the real point is Pedigree and their true commitment to the cause. The cynical might suggest it is a one off PR stunt. Not so. Pedigree really are pet people (dogs to be precise).

I’ve previously posted a brilliant spot featuring slow motion footage of dogs eating treats. It captures everything that the pet owner wants to see in a deliriously happy dog. And it is incredibly shot.

But back to the commitment to the annual Adoption Drive. last year Pedigree launched an eight part online documentary series for Facebook and YouTube to champion this year’s Pedigree Adoption Drive. The fourth year it has partnered with PetRescue.

Few campaigns can even claim a 4 year period of consistency. Yet fewer can claim such creative resourcing of the campaign which is based on the simple insight of pet lovers wanting to help dogs (not just nurture their own).

To place the icing on the cake, the entire effort is branded in the now trade mark yellow and black.

This is one of the best examples of a strong brand leader asserting it’s position in market through exemplary strategy and on-brief execution. The fact that they left the kitchen floor / bowl advertising and championed something new in the category is to their credit.

And here is one of the best pet ads ever made…

Woolworth’s Everyday Rewards ad – the simple talking green pea

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Woolworth’s is the brand leader.

Woolworth’s prices, range and customer experience are far superior to Coles in my view as a shopper. But Coles are doing a fine job at challenging that view.

Both brands battle it out with big budget media spend. Coles have stuck to a consistent brand formula using personalities and price to great effect (…even though they are unlikely to win any creative awards). The new my5 proposition is well sold by Dawn. As Simon McDowell, Coles Marketing Director has stated in adnews: “Who are we trying to appeal to? Are we trying to appeal to 14 million bodies who shop at Coles every week, or are we trying to appeal to the advertising industry? You can guess what my answer is. We’re very clear on our brand and what it stands for. We’re very clear on our personality.” Nice to see an unapologetic marketing response.

Woolworths “the fresh food people” have a new agency and have recently embarked on a couple of pretty different campaigns – “Select” as posted earlier and this one for their equivalent of Coles “Flybuys”. Neither Woolworth’s campaign contributes directly to the core proposition of “fresh food”. This is done by Advertorial promos. Price seems to be tackled through short lead press ads.

The potential risk is that Woolworth’s looks like a challenger brand, following Coles and lacking consistency and a core proposition.

Further to which Coles are on an aggressive PR offensive as a Coles representative has said:

“Woolworths are playing catch-up again but what they have launched is a hastily pulled together program which does nothing for their customers. Their ‘extra special’ rewards program has simply taken the hundreds of promotions that they would have been running for all their customers anyway and made them exclusive to Everyday Rewards Customers. That’s why they were able to respond to my5 so quickly and it explains why they have not included any fresh items including fruit and veg, home brand milk and meat (these items are predominantly private label and so they can’t get them supplier funded)…”

Tough talk.

This ad feels like a tactical effort before the strategic tour de force we all expect from Droga who are cutting new ground in many categories with outstanding creative.

The simplicity of the my5 Coles proposition is winning consumers – 5 regular buys registered and get a discount. The Woolworth’s Everyday rewards response is actually simpler and stronger on paper, but falls short as it is pitched as a response to the other guys. It even references (and therefore credits) the competition’s proposition.

I think that the Coles guys are getting to the Woolies guys…as McDowell concluded: “We take our brand and our business seriously, but we don’t take ourselves too seriously. We are trying to sell and serve with personality, to make ourselves warm and approachable.” I agree, the personality that matches the target (not necessarily all of the creative community) is there. Interesting use of “warm and approachable” versus Woolworth’s Select ads.

A great marketing battle in the making and I look forward to the next salvo from Woolworth’s and Droga as the strategy comes into full swing.

The Wait – anti-smoking ad

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The question is does this work better than showing the physical impact of smoking or the real emotional impact on a family?

I think it could make more of the emotional price paid, the rational message is largely overlooked (ref packaging) – the ads featuring real people who appeal directly to the viewer are arguably more effective. Particularly those featuring people who have died subsequent to making the spot.

A bit more shock and awe combined with the victim verbatim is probably a prerequisite to getting the attention of the stubborn smoker. Actors and inference of the problem have probably become less effective with decreasing impact.

Motorcycle reconstruction – TAC road safety TV Campaign – “Slowing Down Won’t Kill You”

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I ride a bike and have done for many years. I also drive a car.

I therefore notice the campaigns to keep riders safe – those that encourage car drivers to check the blind-spot etc.

The best was still “think once, think twice, think bike” aimed at car drivers who “didn’t see the bike…” before they turned into it.

This ad is one of the worst kind. It depicts the biker as the only one at fault and yet again ignores the role of the car driver.

As written in the Age yesterday: “But nowhere is there any criticism of the driver who has caused an accident by failing to give way when facing a stop sign. There is not a hint of it. There is, instead, a subtext that it is all the rider’s fault, that since he was speeding, the driver can be exonerated entirely.”

I get that it is aimed at speeding bikers, but for a client that should know better, this ad and depicted situation, will alienate all bikers who understand the constant threat of cars turning into their path.

Amazing lack of insight into the both the problem and target.

If it is speed you want to curb, then show the perils of hitting a corner too quickly, not the perils of avoiding cars turning into you without looking!

Ironic that a SupaCheap auto ad does it better than the TAC: http://youtu.be/z8mOX8PdtOU

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/giving-way-on-the-road-wont-kill-you-either-20120509-1yczr.html#ixzz1uWln6pg2

Ford Falcon Ecoboost – Cane Toads on the road

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You have to applaud an attempt at something different, but for the category the bench mark is the Super Bowl work posted here earlier.

This is the launch of a new model in a fairly conservative sector, from a very established brand.

The question is will this execution reach the target, interest them and motivate them to buy the new Falcon?

Interestingly the “power” message is well conveyed and perhaps everyone does indeed know what the Ford Falcon looks like?

Fun Ford Falcon family entertainment.

I look forward to the Cane Toad Activist’s complaints against the gratuitous violence (surely even Cane Toads must have them?)

Lynx Anarchy Invisible ad in Sydney House

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Lynx have been successfully using activation stunts to great effect (ref Virtual Fallen Angels posted earlier).

They get the technology and apply it in a way that drives the PR around the brand and builds brand fame. Even after all these years it still breaks new ground with innovative ideas and causes a stir.

This keeps it fresh and relevant to the target and is integrated into the creative in more traditional media work.

Soap were responsible for this and ECD Brad Eldridge said: “We wanted to create something as disruptive and innovative as the product itself. We used a clever hack combining LCD screens and polaroid glasses to create something that extends the campaign in an innovative and unique way.”

Argentina Falklands Olympic ad

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As many people have already seen this, here is an ITN news report showing the ad and discussing the reaction. The controversy continues to build.

The campaign is titled: ‘Olympic Games 2012: Homage to the Fallen and the Veterans of the Malvinas.’

The spot ends with the words: “To compete on English soil, we train on Argentine soil. In homage to the fallen soldiers and war veterans.”

It shows Argentina hockey captain Fernando Zylberberg running in the Falklands capital, Port Stanley, and exercising on the island’s Great War Memorial, which honours British sailors who died in the First World War.

Despite requests from WPP, the Government of Argentina has refused to bring the ad down. It has been reported Argentina’s foreign secretary Hector Timerman said: “”Britain’s defence minister [Phillip Hammond] demands, like a mighty knight, that Argentina expresses its regret for the creativity of an advert which sums up what we feel.

“He has still not explained what punishment he will select if we refuse to obey his demands. He ought to know the world is a safer place when you use creativity instead of bombing civilian populations in independent countries.”

The International Olympics Committee has denounced the ad, saying the Olympics should not be a fourm to raise political issues.

Far from political action, a number of “British response” ads are already posted on-line provoking some strong reactions on both sides.

The latest is that WPP’s Y&R network will make a contribution to war veterans’ charities in an attempt to compensate for the controversial spot created by its Buenos Aires office.

A different take on the power of advertising.

Vitek Vodka “Parkour” ad – “distilled by peasants drunk by royalty”

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Here’s an interesting one.

My initial thoughts were as follows…A send up of “Parkour” runs as a nice piece of entertainment – it does engage you in the story and the inevitable conclusion. The question is does this build brand awareness for Vitek and give you any reason to buy?

Is it really motivating to suggest that the brand is distilled by Peasants and drunk by Royalty? (I keep thinking about hygiene issues). I’m also not sure that the “made in Australia” claim sits well with the brand positioning around Polish distillers?

There is a series of these and we are encouraged to believe that the distillers, whilst expert in making the vodka, are a bit eccentric when it comes to other skills. Presumably through their single minded dedication to the art of making vodka.

If there was some indication as to why we might believe that the Polish peasant brewers are the best distillers it would help.

Perhaps I’m being a bit too literal and critical, but I do feel that the motivation is lacking to buy the brand when there are so many other alternatives.

So given my skepticism, I went on-line to find out more and uncovered a convenient brand truth!

This is an on-line venture and in his own words goes like this:

“My name is Vitek, I was born in Poland, and grew up watching my father not only infusing vodka but also distilling it. So by the time I was a teenager, I knew how to put a bag of potatoes into a bottle.

Regardless of what I was doing professionally I always considered vodka a hobby – until now – suddenly it’s a job and a business.

Like all hobbies you become a bit of an authority on the subject and today I am regarded – in all modesty – as one of Australia’s leading vodka experts.
By applying traditional infusion methods that have been in our family for generations, to a contemporary product, I have created a range of fresh produce vodkas that have received both critical and commercial acclaim. They are Rose, Coffee and Strawberry.

Vitek Vodkas are purposely at 25% A/V because they are designed to be enjoyed for their flavour. They can be drunk with food, as a sipping drink or just hanging out with friends – much like wine. Doing that at 40% A/V, which most vodka is, would get you so trashed you would be losing friends instead of making them.

Like all vodka, Vitek Vodka should be drunk very cold. Put it in a freezer for a couple of hours or in the fridge for several hours before you drink it. Come in, have a look around and get real with the only flavoured vodka that’s made from real ingredients not chemicals.”

I then spotted some magazine articles (Vogue no less!) on Vitek and was left wondering why the ads don’t bring more of this marvelous provenance and product differentiation to life! There is some creative gold in the Rose, Chocolate, Coffee and Strawberry frozen sipping infusions, as the magazine articles point out.

Couple this to a genuinely interesting and innovative website and the product differentiation leaps out at you.

From skeptic to fan in a matter of clicks.

A sin to say it (..to some), but perhaps spending more on the PR campaign will build this into a bigger and better proposition!

IKEA Radio ad – holidays with the swearing kid

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Monkeys as an agency is on a roll.

Star Casino, Oak Hungry Thirsty and one of my favourite categories (if completely undervalued) radio.

A cracking piece of radio work that uses the medium to best effect and shows genuine insight to the problem that IKEA suggests it can solve.

Strong strategy supported by excellent execution.

NRL Mothers Day TV ad

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The NRL needs to strike a balance between depicting a tough contact sport which attracts the core fan and attracting families.

The traditional “rock” approach will always work and I think that this “ode to mums” presents a nice truth behind the game. Rather than presenting saintly heroes (who invariably let you down…), this shows blokes who play rugby talking about their mums. It’s all about a balanced view.

It might help the rejectors to reassess the brand and mum’s and sons will feel the emotion.

A good tactical use of air-time and nicely produced given that we aren’t dealing with actors!

Cadbury Dairy Milk Marvellous Creations

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As suspected, the “Joyville” ad posted here previously was the beginning of a wonker-like ride into the fun filled world of Cadbury.

This one is specific to Marvellous Creations.

A big production. No doubt appealing to the kids, but I would love to see it evolve with even more amazing bells and whistles. The pint and a half work stretched our imagination a bit more and I think in such a fun category even more liberties could be taken?

I like it – a nice diversion from the usual bite and mmmm approach. And the branding is top notch.

Eagerly awaiting more…actually still waiting for my multiple free bars “won” over a month ago!

There will be stories “Welcome to the Jungle” – Sydney’s Star Casino ad

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Rarely do you come across TV work where you are intrigued enough to really want to watch it through and see who or what it is advertising.

This is one of those rare ads – nicely shot of course and wonderfully cast ( a genuine legend in Bill Baker and a large cast at that…), with a nod perhaps to Fat Boy Slim’s “Weapon of Choice” video featuring Christopher Walken? http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ZM1fkHQP_Pw

Heaps of watchability in repeat viewing – spotting the Ducatti in the pool, red Ferrari, Hippy, Emu line up and more.

Welcome to the Jungle – is a nice touch. Relevant to what they are selling and a nice re-imagining of the Guns n Roses original.

Good work from the Monkeys in Sydney

As an interesting post script – debate is raging in the trade press (ref. B&T) following Richard Chees’e claim of plagiarism on the music. The Monkeys have strongly denied this.

Here is his version and his Facebook page is pretty much to the point in terms of his opinion…

http://www.facebook.com/richardcheese: “Wtf. Wtf??????? Wtf!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is a commercial for some casino in Australia, and they ripped off my “Welcome To The Jungle” arrangement!!!!!!!!!!! You shonky ratbags!!! I’ll tell you right now, this shall not go unpunished. Crikey!!!”

Charlie Sheen is Reborn with T-Rex – Dutch TV Commercial for Bavaria Beer 0.0%

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Courtesy of AdNews, a “winning” ad with Charlie Sheen.

Already getting some attention! I for one was wondering just what sort of ending we would get.

Great music track and coupled to Mr. Sheen, it no doubt cost a few Euros to put this together. The viral exposure is already paying dividends.

Cadbury Dairy Milk “Joyville” Tv ad

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We all know Gorilla, and many love the glass and a half off-beat view of chocolate making. My favourite is still Bubbly with Nena and her luftballoons (as previously posted here)

The Willy Wonker-ish premise is something everyone can relate to and there are glimpses of nicely cast characters, but does it give you the same feeling of satisfaction and surprise as the others?

One of the successes of the other executions was that they prompted a conversation – either “have you seen” or “how did they do that” in the case of glass and a half.

One of the great successes of their campaigns overall is branding – you know from the very first scene that the colour is Cadbury – brilliant job on owning the colour.

However, owning Wonker territory perhaps demands a more “Tim Burton” view of the world.

I feel that Joyville is a cracking premise / idea, but I would have liked an even more quirky execution to leave me wanting to see it again and talk about it. I think that this could develop nicely.

(Disclaimer: I am addicted to the product and love all things Cadbury)

Red Light Girls in Amsterdam

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Part of a broader campaign and worth watching to the (silent) end.

Expect to see / hear more as the campaign builds.

Check out the Belgium agency website here: http://www.duvalguillaume.com/news/